Justin Nyberg

Cardiosport GT3 - Heart-Rate Monitors: Reviews

The GT3 helps track recovery times and adjusts your zone alerts quickly midrun—great for fartlek training and intervals. The manual is a little puzzling, but the payoff is worth the decoding...

Arc'Teryx Sabre SV: Hard Shells Review

Quiet, slightly stretchy GoreTex fabric. A simple cinchable powder skirt. Smooth-tracking waterproof pit zip. A truly helmet-compatible hood with great periphery visibility. While other hard shells...

CamelBak M.U.L.E. - Hydration Packs: Review

With four easy-access storage pockets, a water-resistant iPod pouch, and a three-liter reservoir guaranteed against punctures for life, this updated classic is a smart pack for long rides and hikes....

Sugoi Speedster 2 - Base Layers: Reviews

Good for Backcountry Sugoi consistently churns out some of the best running apparel, and this midweight synthetic base layer—with built-in hood, integrated mitts, and half-zip for venting—...

Columbia Powder Bowl Parka: Insulated Jackets Review

TwoferThe big selling point here is obvious: You get both a warm, burly ski shell plus a thick, synthetically insulated sweater that can be zipped in to boost the warmth. Both jackets are constructed...

New Balance N5 - Heart-Rate Monitors: Reviews

Looking for high performance at a low price? The N5 tracks lap times, stores data for 30 workouts, and offers the usual gamut of zone alarms, calorie counting, and percent of max—and doesn't...

Kelty Tecate - Hydration Packs: Review

This featherweight back hugger stays in place during even the most jarring bob-and-weave trail running. Pack sparingly: There's space for only energy bars, keys, and a light shell. The spongy back...

Timex Sleek 150-Lap - sport watches: Reviews

Slap HappyThis watch's fumble-free solution to recording your splits: Smack it! The slap-sensitive face works great (and is especially useful when wearing the watch under long sleeves). Plus, the...

Get on Top

The Camp Muir routes up Mount Rainier are all-time classics. Here's what to expect.

Yes You Can: Climb Mount Rainier

It's huge. It's nasty. And it's a beast to get up. But guess what: The summit is worth all the hard work it takes to get there.

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