What's the Best Recovery Gear for Runners?

5 must-have tools to rebound from marathon season

Nov 13, 2014
Outside Magazine

Sometimes it takes more than a good stretch to recover right.    Photo: iStock


With marathon season coming to an end, now is the time to focus on recovery. These five items will help you self-massage, ice down, stretch out—and work your way back to mint condition by ski season.

Roll 8 Recovery Massage Roller ($120)

  Photo: Roll Recovery

When you get one of the Roll 8’s eight rollerblade wheels into a patch of angry tissue, the pain is intense—in a good way. Instead of a foam roller, which relies on your body weight to work out any kicks, this tool uses springs to create the pressure needed for self-massage. Sit on your couch and work out your quads, glutes, IT bands, calves, shins, and hip-flexors.

Lacrosse Ball ($3)

  Photo: Brine

Working a lacrosse ball along the bottom of your foot an excellent cure for plantar fasciitis. While standing, move the ball from your toes to your heel and back. Pay extra special attention to the tender parts of your foot along the arch. Feeling mighty pain tolerant? Try using a golf ball for a deeper massage.

RecoFit Shin Splint Therapy Sleeve ($60)

  Photo: RecoFit

While the benefits of icing are disputed, it sure feels good after a long run. One member of my running group recovered from debilitating shin splints thanks in part to the RecoFit Shin Splint Therapy Sleeve. For a few weeks, he ran with the compression sleeves on his legs, slipping the freezer gel packs over his shins after the workout.

Theraquatics Aqua Jogging Belt ($14)

  Photo: Theraquatics

Throw on a buoyancy belt like the Theraquatics Aqua Jogging Belt and join those octogenarians in the pool for some water aerobics. Don’t be embarrassed: this workout is about as low-impact as active recovery gets and it’s way cheaper than an Alter G zero-gravity treadmill.

OTPTP Pro Roller ($34)

  Photo: OTPTP

While any foam roller can help you work out kinks in key areas like IT bands and hamstrings, we like the OTPTP Pro because its closed-cell foam keeps it firm and durable.

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