Skin Cancer Doubles in Southeast UK

Holiday tans to blame

Apr 22, 2014
Outside Magazine
Skin Cancer news OutsideOnline tanning south east

The rise in European package vacations has contributed to more skin cancer in the Southeast, according to a new study.    Ridofranz/Thinkstock

Skin cancer rates have doubled in southeastern Britain over the past 20 years, according to a new report from Cancer Research UK. (Stateside, the incidience of the cancer has risen by 1.6 percent annually between 2001 and 2010.) With a rise in package holidays to Europe, the must-have tan, and a lack of sunscreen as the suspected culprits, some 2,000 people develop malignant melanoma in the UK region each year.

The latest statistics show that 19 people out of 100,000 are diagnosed with melanoma annually in the southeastern UK. That figure was as low as nine during the early 1990s.

Beyond lack of sun protection on vacations and the popularity of the tanned look, Cancer Research UK also points to the rise of tanning beds as a major factor in growing skin cancer numbers. The report also explains that doctors and technology have become better at finding and diagnosing the disease.

For those affected by skin cancer, melanoma treatment has developed substantially to where eight out of 10 people will survive the disease. Cancer Research UK's study coincides with a partnership with Nivea Sun, which is launching a major sun-safety campaign this summer.

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