Antarctic Islands Now on Google Street View

Trekker captures images to commemorate Shackleton's expedition

Nov 4, 2014
Outside Magazine
shackleton google street view antarctica south georgia islands

"The Pole has already been discovered," Winston Churchill remarked before Shackleton left. "What is the use of another expedition?"    Liam Quinn/Flickr

Digital adventurers around the globe can now view remote islands made famous by British explorer Earnest Shackleton’s legendary survival epic in the Antarctic, 100 years after the voyage began.

In early 1915, a year after the launch of Shackleton’s Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition, his ship, the Endurance, became hopelessly trapped in the Weddel Sea’s pack ice while the crew was en route to attempting the first land crossing of the Antarctic continent. Some 14 months later, the crew took to lifeboats and reached Elephant Island. Shackleton and five other men then set off on a perilous 800-mile crossing to South Georgia Island, where they reached a whaling station. They would eventually rescue the rest of their shipmates.

Now Google, as part of its ongoing effort to provide street views of the known natural world, sent a videographer to retrace some of Shackleton’s path with a 360-degree camera strapped to his back. This past March, during a trip with adventure travel outfitter Lindblad Expeditions, the videographer captured some 10,000 images at nine locations in the Antarctic, including South Georgia Island. Google uploaded the images in late October and created an interactive map of Shackelton’s expedition.

Watch Google’s behind-the-scenes footage here.

Not Now

Open a World of Adventure

Our Dispatch email delivers the stories you can’t afford to miss.

Thank you!