Another Case for Running Barefoot

Jan 27, 2010
Outside Magazine

Seems like mother nature gives us everything we need, including the best running shoes, according to By adding extra calluses our feet can handle a variety of surfaces, says Daniel Lieberman of Harvard college. Lieberman claims that runners with shoes tend to hit the ground heel first. Barefoot runners who hit the dirt on the middle or front of the foot, eliminating intense impact collision—one of the main causes of shin splints and other running ailments. (Already have shin splints? has some great suggestions).

Not so sure about going barefoot, despite the increasing press? We don't blame you, especially since it's winter. Check out our Buyer's Guides for the best new running shoes.

--Aurora Wingard

Filed To: Fitness, Gear

More at Outside

Elsewhere on the Web

Not Now

Open a World of Adventure

Our Dispatch email delivers the stories you can’t afford to miss.

Thank you!