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  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    An iceberg leaves the fjord that leads to Black Angel mine.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    Mininnguaq Kleist of Greenland's Office of Self Governance flies in the daily helicopter shuttle to Uummannaq.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    Two scientists from GEUS, Denmark's geological survey, carry glacier-monitoring equipment to an Air Greenland helicopter.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    Calving glaciers spill off the icecap north of Upernavik.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    The dock at Black Angel mine; the main shaft and zinc deposits are 2,000 feet up the white cliff in the back of the frame.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    Mine operator Tim Daffern at the British-run Black Angel Zine mine near Uummannaq.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    Rule #1 in Greenland: Don't pet the cute sled dogs, or they'll rip you to shreds. This one seemed safe.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    A church in the whaling village of Kangersuatsiaq, a natural strait where the Danes netted belugas in the 19th century.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    The cemetery in Upernavik, on Greenland's central-west coast: Thanks to Danish missionaries, most Greenlanders are Christian, and many have Biblical names.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    The citizens of Niaqornat wave the Greenlandic flag to celebrate the island's steps toward independence.

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