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  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    Traditional medicine for sale in the Yangtze's Tiger Leaping Gorge.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    Paddling the Class IV rapids through the Yangtze's Great Bend.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    The village of Baoshan, 800 feet above the Yangtze.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    A mellow section of the river.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    A Mountain Travel Sobek guide on the Yangtze.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    Locals cook in traditional villages that could be flooded by impending dams.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    The Great Bend of the Yangtze is a 300-mile section through rugged mountains and remote villages.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    Clients and guides scouting Class V rapids on the Yangtze.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    Rafting clients, guides, and local villagers sharing meals on the banks of the river.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    The mountains of China's Yunnan Province are a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site, home to 20 endangered animals and 6,000 rare plants.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    Mountain Travel Sobek's raft pushes through a rapid on their 128- mile journey around a section of the Yangtze's Great Bend.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    The canyon's 12,000-foot walls are twice as high as the Grand Canyon.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    The mountains of China's Yunnan Province are a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site, home to 20 endangered animals and 6,000 rare plants.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    Thousands of villagers could be displaced by the dam scheduled to be built at the top of Tiger Leaping Gorge.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    A local Yunnanese man rows his bamboo boat along the river.
  • Photo: Jed Weingarten

    Padding the flat water toward the end of the canyon.
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Filed To: Rafting, China

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