Coastal Trek

Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick

Jul 4, 2008
Outside Magazine
Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick

Hike the Fundy Footpath    Photo: Wikipedia

If Canada's Atlantic Provinces are the new New England, then the Fundy Footpath is the new (and abbreviated) Appalachian Trail. The 14-year-old, 24-mile wilderness route traverses one of North America's last undeveloped stretches of Atlantic coastline, following the Bay of Fundy north of Saint John from the Big Salmon River to Fundy National Park. The bay is best known for having the world's highest tides—up to 48 feet—so a chart is required reading on this five-day trek. After hugging the cobbly expanses of Long and Seely beaches, the trail climbs 1,000-foot coastal bluffs, descends ravines, and crosses the Goose River. At Little Salmon River, take a four-hour side hike through Eye of the Needle, a narrow canyon enclosed by 200-foot cliffs, to the 300-foot cascade of Walton Glen Falls. There are eight campsites en route, but most of the trail's hikers sleep on the beaches. Above the tide line. Trail maps and free permits are available at the Fundy Trail Interpretive Centre (, at Big Salmon River, a 45-minute drive north from Saint John. River Valley Adventures ( will shuttle your car from Fundy National Park back to the Big Salmon for $150.

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