Irish Climber Dies on Everest

May 25, 2011
Outside Magazine

Photo from ilkerender on Flickr

Irish climber John Delaney died yesterday on Everest, according to 7Summits-Club, the team with whom he was climbing. The club's web site says Delaney ran into trouble at roughly 28,800 feet and was pronounced dead at 4:30 a.m. after receiving assistance from guides and Sherpas. The Irish Central reports Delaney is survived by his wife and three children, the youngest of whom was born just last Wednesday. In today's Belfast Telegraph, Delaney's mother is quoted as saying his wife "didn't want to tell him that she had the baby until he was coming back.” Delaney was 41.

—Spanish mountaineer Edurne Pasaban has ended her attempt to summit Everest without supplemental oxygen after illness, high winds, and a rescue effort slowed her team's progress. The problems started when two team members began developing altitude sickness at the South Col, according to her blog. Coupled with high winds and cold temperatures, they determined a summit bid without O2 wasn't possible. The team retreated to base camp and shortly thereafter assisted in a rescue effort of Spanish climbers on nearby Lhotse. The 48-hour ordeal was enough for the team to call it quits. "We, the Endesa Everest without O2 expedition, are coming home," Pasaban wrote. "We are exhausted, and Vitor, our weatherman, has forecast good weather for us over the next few days. It is the right decision for us all."

—Richard Parks and Steve Williams made the summit early this morning as part of their 737 Challenge. Parks, a former Wales international rugby player, and Williams, an Olympic gold medalist rower, are attempting to to climb the 7 Summits and reach the three poles (North, South, and Everest summit, which is often called the third pole) in just 7 calendar months. The pair have only Denali and Elbrus remaining.

—Outside blogger Alan Arnette is in Lukla after summiting Saturday. In his most recent post, he answers questions about his fast climbing times this year compared with past attempts and invites readers to post additional questions about his climb.

--Michael Webster

Filed To: Adventure, Climbing

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