The USADA Report Against Lance Armstrong, by the Numbers

Screen Shot 2012-10-11 at 10.10.37 AMLance Armstrong's "zip the lips" gesture to cyclist Filippo Simeoni, who testified against Dr. Michele Ferrari.

The United States Anti-Doping Agency's report on Lance Armstrong doesn’t just say he that doped. It says he was the ringleader of the grandest doping scheme in recent team sports history and that he intimidated his teammates and involved his wife in an illicit quest to win.

Two of the earliest examples of Armstrong's role as a doping kingpin in the USADA report come in 1998, the year he signed with the U.S. Postal Team after beating cancer. The instances demonstrate that he relied on cortisone as a doping substance and helped others on his team do the same.

During the World Championships at Valkenberg in the Netherlands, Armstrong asked his wife Kristin to wrap cortisone tablets in tinfoil. She did, then handed them to him and his teammates. "Lance’s wife is rolling joints," one teammate said.

After a tough day of riding during the Vuelta a España, Armstrong asked teammates Jonathan Vaughters and Christian Vande Velde to go to the car and get a cortisone pill for him. When the pair found no such pill, they came up with a placebo, whittling down an aspirin, wrapping it in tinfoil, and giving it to Armstrong.

In 1998, Lance Armstrong had not yet won his first Tour de France. Yet, even at this point in his career, he was already doping, involving his wife in his doping, and had his teammates in a position where they felt compelled to lie to him in order to satisfy his desire for drugs. The USADA has piled up loads of examples demonstrating that Armstrong and his team doped during each of the seven successive years he won the Tour de France. The quasi-governmental agency said the evidence was enough to prove, "a massive team doping scheme, more extensive than any previously revealed in professional sports history."

The full USADA report is roughly 200 pages. Because you may not have time to read it all, we’ve included some of key findings below, focusing on the numbers.

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