Your Mud-Ready Fall Outfit

The hunting, fishing, hiking, and work clothes built for getting dirty.

Oct 21, 2014
Outside Magazine

When fall gets going, the going gets muddy.    Photo: Adam Baker/Flickr

Fall. The time of brilliant foliage, crisp days—and mud. Thankfully, there's plenty of gear that can withstand the muck. 

Carhartt Shoreline Camo Bib Overalls

  Photo: Carhartt

To play in the mud, you need a pant that’s not going to let in any moisture. Carhartt, renowned for its hardy overalls, now offer a variety of waterproof and water-resistant pants for hunting, fishing and, um, road construction. The Shoreline ($180) features taped seams, a waterproof membrane, and ankle-to-waist zippers for airing out after a day in the swamp.

C. C. Filson Tin Cloth Field Coat

  Photo: Filson

Soak canvas in oil and wax to make it waterproof and fireproof and you get tin cloth, the fabric many miners wore during the Alaska gold rush. Mud won’t saturate the cloth and can easily be wiped from the surface. C.C. Filson’s Field Coat ($395) is designed for hunting (hence the blood-proof pockets), but it can handle any dirt-based activity. 

UA Speed Freak Glove

  Photo: Under Armour

Under Armour's success with the light and fast sportswear line translate well to its rugged hunting gear. The UA Speed Freak ($45), made for the rigor of cold season hunting, has water-resistant fabric and taped seams to keep your hands dry. A gel palm stops mud and grit from entering the glove.

North Face Thermoball Vest

  Photo: The North Face

It’s not easy to find layers that can be dropped in a puddle and still keep you warm. The North Face has worked on the warm-when-wet conundrum for a long time. Its most recent solution: ThermoBall ($149), a synthetic insulation equivalent to 600-fill down. The biggest benefit for mud puppies? The jackets, vests, and scarves come in colors that hide the dirt. 

Woolrich Day Tripper

  Photo: Woolrich

Flannel has always been the fabric of the working man, but it has its drawbacks: heavy, slow to dry, and not breathable. Woolrich’s Day Tripper ($79) looks like a classic flannel shirt, but if you fall face first into a mud puddle you’ll see the difference. The polyester is quick to dry and wicks moisture away from the skin. 

Muck Boot Pursuit Glory

  Photo: Original Muck Boot Company

The Original Muck Boot Company has made mud-ready footwear for 15 years. The company’s original offerings—essentially ultra-comfortable rubber boots—earned it a loyal fan base who liked the simple style and proven durability. Now, Muck Boots is expanding into hunting and winter-specific lines with footwear such as the 16-inch-tall Pursuit Glory ($250). 

Sealskinz Trekker Sock

  Photo: Sealskinz

Waterproof socks are a must for rainy, muddy fall days. Designed in the U.K., Sealskinz prodcucts are some of the best in the industry. This solid sock ($58) is comfortable, lightweight, and dry.  Plus, a merino wool liner keeps your foot warm and the smell down. 

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