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  • Photo: John Webster

    On snowboarding’s packed competition calendar, one event deserves to call itself legendary (and it does). The Mt. Baker Legendary Banked Slalom is one of the country’s longest-running snowboard comps, having started in 1985 as a flowy ride through a naturally-formed halfpipe that snakes down the White Salmon side of the mountain. Today, the pioneering snowboarding event is also one of the last in which pros compete alongside amateurs. There’s no cash to be won, there’s no sponsored after-party—and that’s the point. The course is a thrill ride, the crowds are spirited, and everyone (pros included) is there to have a good time. Think of it as a huge reunion for boarding fiends—one where you also get to watch the sport’s best make high-speed turns on a huge, twisting course.

    After a dry winter canceled the 2015 race, the Banked Slalom returned to northwest Washington determined to make its 30th year of competition the biggest yet. The multi-day event drew 473 riders, counting among their ranks pros like Terje Haakonsen, the event’s winningest male, and Olympian Lindsey Jacobellis. Even the snow gods seemed determined to get in on the action, dumping 32 inches over four days. As photographer and snowboarder John Webster discovered, the Banked Slalom is still the best display of the sport’s funhog spirit.

    Photo: Turning may be the most basic move in the snowboarding, but it’s also the most demonstrative. Riders at the Banked Slalom need to know how to pick the fastest line and stay on it.

  • Photo: John Webster

    Thanks to an annual lottery system, the Banked Slalom offers fearless amateurs the chance to share the course with the biggest names in the sport. In 2015, 1,130 entrants competed for 95 slots. Organizers hold a qualifier specifically for locals in January.
  • Photo: John Webster

    The first Banked Slalom was held in 1985, when Mt. Baker was one of the only resorts on the West Coast to allow snowboarding and riders still duct taped their Sorel boots to their boards. The sport has grown up, but duct tape, in the form of a tape roll-shaped metal trophy, still ends up in the hands of the winners and the front leg of every rider.
  • Photo: John Webster

    The race runs 16 different categories, from 7-year-olds in the Next Generation class to 68-year-old Super Masters. It’s a family affair, with parents and kids both racing and friends boarding alongside the course, blasting boom boxes to pump up riders. This year, the little groms impressed, provoking excited whispers among the pros that the sport’s future is in good hands.
  • Photo: John Webster

    Builders change the Banked Slalom course annually, with this year serving up 43 quad-busting turns. The idea is simple—make it around all the gates with the fastest time—but the course is punishing, taking riders up and down steep banks for an exhausting two-plus minutes and sending more than a few off course and into deep powder.
  • Photo: John Webster

    The start list reads like a who’s who of snowboarding. This year, Barrett Christy, Terje Haakonsen, Temple Cummins, Maelle Ricker, Jamie Lynn, and other legends took part. Josh Dirksen, who runs the Dirksen Derby banked slalom race at Mt. Bachelor, benefiting paralyzed snowboarder Tyler Eklund, checked out the course before walking away with fourth in the Men’s Pro Division. “It’s been a lot of years since [we had] a classic Baker course,” Dirksen said. “It’s a pleasure to ride.”

  • Photo: John Webster

    The clouds separate, revealing Mt. Shuksan in all its glory. When the snow falls, many competitors slip away to lay fresh tracks in nearby Shuksan Arm and Hemispheres backcountry areas or to take an inbounds powder run, hoping to return with enough leg strength to lay down a good time.
  • Photo: John Webster

    Competitors and onlookers camped out in Mt. Baker’s White Salmon parking lot, strumming guitars, shooting off fireworks, and trying to avoid the attention of local cops. Those who didn’t car camp ventured down to the nearby town of Glacier, population 211, where a cold beer at Chair 9 made up for the total lack of cell service.
  • Photo: John Webster

    Riders in the start shack are a bundle of nerves and adrenaline, both of which they hope to channel into a fast time. Once you’re out of the shed, though, it’s all thrills. “Everyone who rides the course is like, ‘It’s just fun.’ You don’t have to risk your life throwing yourself off a 50-foot gap to be rad,” says race organizer Amy Howat Towbridge, who’s won a couple gold duct tape trophies herself. “It just reminds everyone snowboarding is really, really fun, and that’s what it’s all about.”
  • Photo: John Webster

    From blue skies Saturday to nuking snow Sunday, riders saw a range of conditions. Wax strategies changed, but spirits stayed high.
  • Photo: John Webster

    As spectators spilled off Chair Five to watch the competition, the clouds broke to reveal the sun—and a rare rainbow. Says Webster, “It was like snowboarding heaven.”
  • Photo: John Webster

    The stoke was high among the female pros (from left to right: Spencer O'Brien, Leanne Pelosi, and Colleen Quigley).

    "I have been coming up here since I was a kid," says O’Brien, who finished in fourth place. “This event has such a sacred place in snowboarding. I hope it never goes anywhere.”

  • Photo: John Webster

    The turns are sharp, forcing riders to dig in their edges and get low to the ground. This year, the last section of the pro finals was rerouted, sending the experts down a steeper section that spit out at the same finish line.
  • Photo: John Webster

    The annual Banked Slalom Baked Salmon went off on Saturday afternoon, with more than 400 pounds of salmon caught, baked, and served up by local fisherman Reider Solberg. [The weekend] just fully evolved into mainly a reunion,” Howat Towbridge said.
  • Photo: John Webster

    Pro snowboarder Mike Basich camped out in his his self-built 225-square-foot home on wheels. Baish’s tiny home is so ubiquitous in the community that he opted to list the model of his truck, instead of his hometown, on the startlist.

    “That house has probably seen more million-dollar views than most people,” says Webster. “They were serving free hot chocolate out of it one night to friends who would stop by and look into the window.”

  • Photo: John Webster

    Final race times aren’t announced, so competitors rely on guessing who looked fastest until winners are crowned at the awards ceremony. “For their second run, we unplug the timing display and go radio silent so they don’t know who is doing what,” says Howat Towbridge. “It definitely makes it exciting at the awards ceremony because nobody has a clue who won.”
  • Photo: John Webster

    At the awards ceremony, up-and-comers stand shoulder to shoulder with their heros, packing the White Salmon Lodge and fogging up the windows. It took three hours to divvy up awards for 16 categories, but the energy level never wavered. In addition to the coveted duct-tape trophy, winners walk away with an embroidered Carhatt jacket, Pendleton blanket, and an original piece of local art. Past prizes have included custom surfboards, travel-sized guitars, and blown glass.

    This year, an informal vote also determined whether to extend the course, meaning fewer racers, or to shorten it and open up new slots. The crowd’s roar left no question of the verdict: the more the merrier.

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