• Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Early in the summer of 2012, I was in the middle of a move from New York City to Boulder. As my plane approached Denver International Airport, I heard gasps from passengers looking out the windows toward the mountains. A harsh red streak outlined the ridgetops, and black plumes of smoke rose into large pyrocumulus clouds. I’d seen tornados, earthquakes, hurricanes, and floods, but never a wildfire.

    I spent the rest of that summer watching a parade of trucks roll through the streets surrounding Boulder. The ash-covered faces of firefighters were glued to the windows. Many looked young. All looked tired. When I turned on the news, I saw heartbreaking stories of damage, destruction, and displaced citizens. But I never saw footage of those faces endlessly driving by my house. At the end of fire season, I began a multiyear process of gaining the necessary access to tell the stories of the men and women who work countless hours to put out the fires.

    Beginning in 2014, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, I immersed myself with Wildland Fire Incident Command Teams throughout the country. I slept in tents, on the grass, and in trucks with the many different units responsible for fire abatement, from the glamorous hotshots to the unsung radio dispatchers. Fires are remembered by the scope and scale of their destruction. My goal was to show the army that stopped them.

    Photo: Two Roosevelt Hotshots, from the Roosevelt National Forest in Colorado, conducting a burn operation at the Happy Camp Fire Complex (2014) in California.

    Photos and words from Aaron Colussi.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Hotshot crews at twilight on the Happy Camp Fire Complex in the Klamath National Forest, Northern California. In a burn operation, firefighters start a fire to increase the width of a fire line, creating a buffer between the flames and unburnt ground. This particular burn created a vacuum, sending flames to the main fire (a few hundred yards to the right of frame), which created a fire line of a few hundred yards. Days after this burn, large wind gusts pushed embers over that line and into the forest behind the camera, igniting a new area.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    During my coverage, I talked to and photographed dozens of firefighters, some of whose names I was able to get, and some I missed in the heat of the moment.

    Clockwise from top left: an AmeriCorps member working her first prescribed burn outside of Estes Park Colorado; firefighter at the Pioneer Fire in Idaho; Roosevelt Hotshot Yuzu Yamada at the Eightmile Fire in Colorado; Eric, from the Arrowhead Hotshots out of King’s Canyon National Park, California; Roosevelt Hotshot Josh Ross at the Happy Camp Complex in California; firefighter Melody Fontaine, from Shoshone National Forest, at the Hunter Peak Fire in Wyoming; a firefighter from the Bighorn Basin at the Hunter Peak Fire in Wyoming; Roosevelt Hotshot Thomas Partipilo at the Happy Camp Fire Complex in California.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Left: Public information officer Kale Kasey, my media escort at the Hunter Peak Fire (2016) in East Yellowstone, Wyoming, walking a ridgeline. Vast amounts of smoke from this summer’s fires created wild sunsets. Center: A Roosevelt Hotshot having fun during a quick break at the Happy Camp Fire Complex in California. A large DC10 plane dumps retardant on the edge of a bulldozer line. Moments after this photo was taken, I was completely covered in pink. Right: A burn operation at the Happy Camp Fire Complex in California. Burn operations can be very dangerous depending on the type of trees in the forest. A tree in the middle of the frame ignited and created a large flaming spire.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Helicopter cranes dump retardant on the Soberanes Fire (2016) in California’s Los Padres National Forest.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    A cockpit view of a retardant drop on the Soberanes Fire in California. The long hose can draw in more than 2,000 gallons of retardant or water in approximately 30 seconds. In an area with a severe water shortage, tankers filled with water to supply the helicopters come from far away.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Left: Firefighter Steve Welch, from the Orange Country Fire Authority, on night-shift duty at the Soberanes Fire. Local and city firefighters are brought in to help on fires this large. Additional personnel from AmeriCorps, the California Conservation Corps, the National Guard, and the Marines will be brought in if needed. Right: Helicopter pilot Kenny Chapman at the Soberanes Fire. A pilot for more than 30 years, Chapman has lost count of how many fires he has worked.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    The Soberanes Fire at night. What began as an ember from an illegal campfire near Salinas turned into the most expensive fire in U.S. history, costing more than $210 million. At its peak, the fire was assigned more than 5,000 personnel, in part because of its proximity to the Monterey Peninsula and California wine country.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Morning briefing at the Hunter Peak Fire (2016) in Wyoming. No matter the fire’s scale, morning and evening briefings are conducted each day to give the crews and overhead staff information on what the next 24 hours will bring for each unit. Weather shifts on a fire can alter plans instantly, so communication between crews in tents and on the line is essential.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    A look inside a Roosevelt Hotshot buggy at the Eightmile Fire (2014) in Colorado. These buggies become a home away from home for the crews during fire season.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Crews from Shoshone National Forest walk a ridgeline after putting in miles of hand line outside Yellowstone National Park on the Hunter Peak Fire (2016). This hand line was about a mile away from the active fire. It was intended to create a barrier between the fire and the dry grass. A hand line only a few feet wide can hold a decent fire.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    A Little Tujunga Hotshot crew member from the Angeles National Forest conducting a burn operation on the Soberanes Fire. This is a small look at a burn operation that spanned nearly 30 miles.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Left: Public information officer Kale Casey at the Hunter Peak Fire in Wyoming. Center: Hotshot crews walk up a slope on a bulldozer line at the Happy Camp Fire Complex in California. Right: Roosevelt Hotshot Caleb Lodico preparing to pack a buggy truck at the Eightmile Fire.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    A public information officer describing fire details to tourists outside Yellowstone National Park. At one point during the summer, the Yellowstone area had five active fires, causing many road closures and traffic delays.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Firefighters patrolling the fire line at the Soberanes Fire.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Firefighters spraying down ancient oak trees at the Soberanes Fire. Los Padres National Forest, outside Big Sur, is home to 1,000-year-old oaks. During burn operations, crews were charged with hosing down these ancient trees to help them survive the flames.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Members of the Del Rosa Hotshots, based outside Los Angeles, take a quick snack break and refuel their chainsaws’ gas canisters. During the most intense times, crews will work up to 16-hour shifts.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Hotshots dig a line around a large cedar tree at the Happy Camp Fire Complex in California.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Firefighters on the Hunter Peak Fire shield their eyes from an incoming helicopter transport. If a fire is situated in rough terrain, helicopter shuttles are needed to bring in crews.
  • Photo: Aaron Colussi

    Top: Smoke trails illuminated by the midnight sun in Gates of the Arctic National Park, in northern Alaska. Often, wildfires in remote regions of Alaska are monitored rather than directly attacked. Bottom: Incident Command Center for the Hunter Peak Fire, Wyoming.
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