The Go List

Find your own path through Zion National Park, Utah.     Photo: Kelnkelp/Thinkstock

The Secret to Exploring Zion Like a Local

Beat the crowds on the not-so-beaten path this summer in one of America's favorite national parks.

Zion is one of the country's most beautiful national parks. It's also one of the most crowded.

More than two million visitors flock to this part of Utah per year, placing Zion among the top 10 most-visited parks in the nation. Thankfully, there are plenty of opportunities to escape the tourists within this 229-square-mile preserve. Here are a few of our favorite routes to get you off the beaten path: 

Climb Kolob Canyon

  Photo: Andrew K. Smith/Flickr

If climbing above the spot where Paul Newman and Robert Redford got into a knife fight sounds like a good time, hit the road for Lambs Knoll in Kolob Canyon. To reach the crag, drive through the town of Virgin and then 10 miles north on Kolob Terrace Road. After crossing a cattle guard and exiting the park, turn left and leave your vehicle at the roundabout. A sandy trail will take you toward Lambs Knoll, where shady sport routes dot the sandstone walls.

Even better for climbing in summer months is the South Fork in Kolob Canyon, where more than 30 sport and trad routes, such as the four-star Huecos Rancheros (5.12c), offer options for climbers of all levels.

After sending your project, continue up the paved road from Lambs Knoll to find Lava Point—Zion’s only free, maintained camping area. With just six sites, you'll be lucky to nab a spot, but if you do, you won't have to worry about crowds. Take a post-climb dip in 250-acre Kolob Reservoir, and if camping doesn’t vibe with your group’s style, return to Springdale for an evening of well-deserved enchiladas at the locals’ favorite saloon, the Bit & Spur

Run the Trans-Zion Trek

  Photo: Louis Vest/Flickr

If you really want to earn your post-adventure fish tacos, the Trans-Zion Trek is the trail for you. Sometimes called the Zion National Park Traverse, this 47.3-mile path cuts through sandstone and juniper, with nearly 6,000 feet in elevation change along the way. Known as one of the most scenic long runs in the country, the Trans-Zion takes anywhere from an eight-hour ultramarathon sprint to five days to accomplish, and like the nearby canyoneering routes, requires a backcountry permit from Zion National Park.

Take a shuttle from Zion Adventure Company to Lee Pass, located at the less popular northwestern corner of the park. Here you’ll begin the gradual descent toward Kolob Arch and Lava Point before reentering the more populated scenic-drive section of the park, where you’ll find views of the famous Angels Landing from a whole new angle. Come prepared with a topographic map and data book including information on mileage, water source recommendations, and campsites from ultrarunner Andrew Skurka. Post-ultra, refuel with a WhoopAss burger at Oscar’s Cafe in Springdale and probably a beer or five. Spend the night recuperating at the Cable Mountain Lodge, a stone’s throw from the Virgin River, where you can cool your aching toes.

Canyoneer Orderville Gulch

  Photo: Nicholas Jones/Flickr

Zion Adventure Company guide B.J. Cassell describes Orderville Canyon (aka Gulch)—the expert’s preferred way to get to the famous Narrows—as “one of the most underrated canyons in Zion.” Both wet and wild, the descent through Orderville features two large obstacles that require technical skills and equipment. Rated 3B III on the canyoneering scale, Orderville requires rappelling gear, a wet or drysuit depending on when you visit, and proficient canyoneering skills. Pick up a permit, required for all technical canyoneering excursions, at the Zion National Park backcountry desk or book online in advance.

Before hitting the road, fuel up with whiskey-infused coffee at Deep Creek Coffee in Springdale. You’ll need to either shuttle a car or tag along with Zion Adventure Company to the trailhead at Orderville Corral, off North Fork Road on the northern entrance to the park. If you bring your own vehicle, make sure it’s high clearance and 4WD. From here, you’ll begin the six-plus-hour, 12.3-mile journey that will take you through the gulch and back to the top of Zion’s scenic drive. Orderville spits you out at the Temple of Sinawava, which is the start of the well-known Narrows. There, you’ll rejoin the less-sandy tourists on a free shuttle back to the park entrance.

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