Winter in the National Parks: Grand Teton

Cold enthusiasts rejoice, the national parks are open all season

Grand Teton National Park.     Photo: IDAK/Shutterstock

Entrance Fee

$25 per vehicle, $12 per biker/hiker (includes admission to Yellowstone )

FOUNDED: 1929
SIZE: 310,000 acres

Grand Teton might seem like Yellowstone’s tiny younger cousin, but the Teton Mountains are one of the most iconic landmarks in the U.S. The Uinta ground squirrel, endemic to the region, will be sleeping when you get there, but don’t feel bad. He hibernates eight months out of the year.

HOW TO GET THERE
As with Yellowstone, the recommended option is to fly into Jackson and rent a car. Beware of road closures as you venture out. Many of the roads throughout the park shut down for the winter.

WHERE TO STAY
In the park you can stay at Dornan's Spur Ranch Cabins or camp at Colter Bay for $5 per night. Backcountry camping is allowed, but can get tricky in the wild wintry conditions that tend to sweep down from the Tetons.

WHAT TO DO
Skiing and snowshoeing are very popular in the park. Rangers offer guided snowshoe tours that last about two hours. Climbing during the winter is not recommended, but ask the park office for more information if that’s why you’re visiting. If you’re a fishing fanatic, we recommend you come here to try some ice fishing, which is allowed almost everywhere in the park.

THINGS TO REMEMBER
⇢ Be careful in Teton as conditions change quickly.
⇢ Pack your heavy weather coat for the cold.

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