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Adventure : Celebrities

Outside Videos You Should Not Have Missed Last Month

Whether you didn't catch these viral vids the first time around or just want to watch them again, here are the top 10 videos from the month of May. 

10. Ty's List: Trailer

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In what promises to be one of the most touching stories of the year, three strangers come together to honor a friend's life that was cut far too short. 

9. Behind the Scenes with Jimmy Chin

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Who doesn't love a little Jimmy Chin? And if he needed any more cool points, the all around rock star introduces us to his shcokingly cute baby behind-the-scenes of his May cover shoot. 

8. Huayhuash: Peruvian MTB Adventure

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Certainly a trip to remember for this adventurous crew as they biked through the rainy and unforgiving Peruvian Andes. They found some new lines and even a gun-weilding cowboy along the way. 

7. Last Weekend: Carbondale, CO

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There's something beautiful about the simplicity of a weekend outdoors. Carl Zoch adds a cool twist by biking, hiking, and finally floating to complete a roundtrip outing in the mountains of Colorado. 

6. Dean Potter Fly-By at Mountainfilm 2014

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Dean Potter is back in the news for his idea to bring his dog, Whisper, along for his wingsuit flights. Say what you will, but Potter can still pull off some pretty cool aerial stunts. 

5. Twenty Eight Feet: Life on a Little Wooden Boat

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Restoring an old wooden boat and giving up the luxuries of land in search of happiness and adventure? Sign us up. This one will make you long for life at sea. 

4. Craig Alexander's Core Workout

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We’re all gluttons for a good workout, and Craig Alexander’s Core Workout will certainly get your midsection up to par. The three-time IRONMAN World Champion doesn’t skimp on one of the most important, yet often overlooked areas of fitness.

3. Outside Talks: Lance Armstrong

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Lance opens up about whether he really won those races, his dramatically altered post-scandal life, and what his legacy might be. In true Lance fashion, he doesn't sugar-coat much. 

2. How to Fix a Flat: Lance Armstrong 

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Lance Armstrong fixing a flat tire. This one speaks for itself. Watch cycling’s most infamous rider working his latest bike-shop gig and get a few pointers on what to do when you break down.

1. 80 and Still Cycling

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A profile of an 80-year-old Italian cyclist that hasn't given up his love of cycling. This short will leave you inspiried and maybe even wanting to jump on a bike. 

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Bringing Home Your Own Bacon with Fitness Expert Ben Greenfield

Fitness and nutrition expert, Ben Greenfield takes his food seriously.

The author, speaker, podcast producer, and coach has made a career of advising athletes on how to train and maintain good health habits. To practice what he preaches, Greenfield has transformed the kitchen in his Spokane, Washington, home into a living example of to eat locally and produce your own food. There, he gardens, hunts, and ferments—and plans to have his own chickens and goat before long.

“I love that we have a real connection with our food, and that our kids can identify the plants in our garden,” he says.

He hopes his habits will convince his clients and followers to overcome the intimidation factor in growing and sourcing food. By following some of the Greenfield family’s simple habits, anyone can take a more active role in deciding what foods to eat.         

“People are out of their comfort zone,” Greenfield explains. “They don’t know where to start.”

Many of his culinary strategies are easy for novices to adopt, while others require more work, skills, and space. One of the most basic ways to start producing your own food is by gardening. City dwellers with no yards of their own can seek out a plot in a local community garden.

And because some plants require less maintenance and care than others, Greenfield suggests starting with fast-growing crops like arugula and radishes. Another quickly flourishing plant is kale, which Greenfield suggests as a staple in an athlete’s diet because of its high iron content. Zucchini and summer squash are also easy to grow, he says, adding that they can serve as an alternative to pasta for athletes looking to limit their carbs.

At Greenfield’s house in Spokane, he and his wife, Jessa, have turned their backyard into a garden, where they grow all these vegetables. Most mornings, Greenfield heads to the garden to pick kale or other dark, leafy greens for his daily smoothie, which, he swears, tastes more robust as a result. The family also grows cucumbers, berries, corn, tomatoes, herbs, and other crops.

Aside from fresh produce, the Greenfields preserve food by canning and fermenting it. They take cucumbers from the garden and brine them to make pickles. They ferment carrots, cabbage, and peppers to make kimchi, and also make their own yogurt and kefir. Anyone can ferment or can food, Greenfield explains—and they don’t even need their own garden to do so.

Greenfield suggests that fermenting novices start with his family’s pickle recipe. Not only is the process easy, but pickle juice can help athletes replace electrolytes after a long run or ride. The Greenfields place cucumbers in an ice bath for two hours, then transfer them to a glass jar with a tablespoon of mustard seed, two fresh heads of dill, two heads of garlic, one tablespoon of salt, and four tablespoons of whey. (You can get whey from a yogurt container by simply scooping out the liquid that settles at the top.) They fill the jar with water to cover the cucumbers and let it sit on the counter at room temperature for three days. During that time, they shake the jar vigorously for 30 seconds two to three times a day and briefly open the lid after each shaking to release the gases that accumulate. The pickles are then ready to put in the refrigerator and eat.

In addition to gardening and preserving, Greenfield supplies much of the household meat by hunting, bringing home 50 to 60 pounds of white tail deer each season. He plans to start hunting turkeys as well. Since Greenfield doesn’t have to travel far to hunt, he spends little on the endeavor, paying only for a license and a butcher, who parcels the meat into freezer-friendly cuts.

If hunting isn’t an option, Greenfield suggests buying a portion of a grass-fed cow from a local company, as he does every year. The Greenfields save money by purchasing the meat in bulk, supporting a local rancher in the process.

Down the road, the Greenfields plan to continue expanding on the ways they can produce their own food. They’re building new digs on a larger plot of land so they can cultivate a bigger garden, raise ducks or chickens for fresh eggs, keep a goat for milk, and possibly even build a greenhouse for growing crops that normally wouldn’t survive Spokane’s northern climate.

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Lance Armstrong: "Yes, I Feel Like I Won the Races"

In his first public appearance since his Oprah confession, Lance Armstrong opens up again about his revoked Tour titles and how life has changed since the doping scandal peaked. Did Armstrong really win the Tour de France seven years in a row? It depends on whom you ask. But Armstrong still thinks so. 

Is this the beginning of Lance 3.0? Is he worthy of forgiveness, redemption, and a chance to return to public life? One thing's for sure, he's too much of a fighter to just walk away, and we'll be seeing and hearing more from him in the months to come.

Lance Armstrong Speaks to Outside

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Can Michael Phelps Win Again?

Just before the 2012 Olympics, Michael Phelps told Anderson Cooper in a 60 Minutes interview, “Once I retire, I’m retitring. I’m done.” Phelps went on to win six medals in London, bringing his total medal count to 22, then promptly threw in his Speedo. Or so he said.
 
Today, Phelps’ longtime coach, Bob Bowman, announced that Phelps will compete at a swim meet in Mesa, Arizona on April 24-26. It will be the first time Phelps has competed since London. "I think he's just going to test the waters a little bit and see how it goes," Bowman told the Associated Press. "I wouldn't say it's a full-fledged comeback."
 
Bowman’s effort to lower our expectations didn’t work. There is nothing we’d like more than to see the most decorated Olympic athlete of all time return to the five-ringed stage. So we asked Stanford exercise physiologist, Anne Friedlander, what it will take for Phelps to kick ass in 2016, at the at the ripe old age of 31.

Less Volume

“The biggest thing he’s gonna have to think about is training smarter,” Friedlander says. Phelps famously swam 80,000-plus meters a week (that’s about 50 miles) leading into the 2008 Olympics. That extremely high-volume regimen may not work this time around. “He could need more recovery time,” Friedlander says.

As people age, their tissues become less resilient and more susceptible to damage. “The body was very forgiving when he was young; now he’s going to have to have a smarter training plan—decrease the volume a little bit and higher intensity with more recovery time.”
 

Watch the Power

“He may find that he doesn’t have quite the explosive power that he used to,” Friedlander says. As athletes age, they tend to lose some of their Type II, fast-twitch muscle fibers, and neurological signaling from the brain to the muscles slows down, though the difference in explosive power between the ages of 27 and 31 may be negligible.
 
In a sport where hundredths of seconds count, however, a minutely less explosive start off the blocks could knock a swimmer out of medal contention. The lineup Phelps is scheduled to swim in Arizona—the 50- and 100-meter free, and the 100 butterfly—suggests he’s testing out his speed rather than his endurance.
 
While it’d be easy to say swimmers, like runners, move on to longer distance events as they age, history says that’s just not true. Dara Torres became a worldwide celebrity when she competed in the 2012 Olympic Trials at the age of 45—in the 50 free. She finished fourth in the final heat.

In other sports, athletes with decades in the game have also managed to stay on top. Like Phelps, Brazilian soccer legend Pelé was a teen superstar. He was nearly 30 when he played in his fourth and final World Cup, the quadrennial international soccer championship. The plays he made during that game helped secure his team a victory, and are cited as some of his most famous. He was even named player of the tournament.

Olympic gold medalist, Andre Agassi, turned pro at 16. By the age of 25, he was ranked the number one tennis player in the world. At 32, he became the oldest player to rank second in the world. It wasn’t until he was 36 that extreme back pain forced him to retire.

It’s Going to Be Mental

“Experience really does play a role in this, knowing when to push, when to hold back, what to do in between races, things like that,” Friedlander says. “Understanding the competition, having been in those events before. Just being able to deal with the stress” could give him an edge younger, more resilient athletes don’t have—as long as he stays cool. “For him, a person who’s accomplished more than anyone else, is this gravy, or does it increase the pressure because expectations are so high? I don’t know, that’s in his own head.”
 
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