The Outside Blog

Adventure : Footwear

On Cloudracer

The Cloudracer’s rubber springs are no gimmick. Though the Swiss-engineered shoe sports a thin, almost minimalist mid-sole, the rubber pads compress on each impact, so it takes almost all the sting out of the road while still feeling fast and low to the ground.

“I didn’t know what to make of this shoe at first, but I’m sold,” said one tester. The swap of rubber springs for foam cushioning should also boost the life span, and hot-weather runners will love the extremely breathable, all-mesh upper.

The bottom line: A tempo-run tool for the fleet of foot, but pronators and heel strikers should steer clear. 7 oz; 5 mm drop

$130, on-running.com 

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A Guide to the Summer's Best Flip-Flops

It's summer's most casual shoe, but that doesn't mean you should settle for the drug-store variety. These flip-flops range from the $24 sunbathers' special to the $110 Birkenstock for hiking up a volcano, then heading to the bar afterward. Keep your feet happy with our 11 favorites for whatever adventure you decide to go on.     

Cushe Manuka Wrap ($70)

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Best for: Minimalists
This soft, full-grain leather flip-flop comes with a cupped suede footbed that breaks in well with wear to conform to your foot. The molded-rubber sole has a Manuka honeycomb design with canvas pressed into it for added durability and support. The sectioned sole isn’t restrictive, and makes walking in these as close to barefoot as you can get with shoes on.

Columbia Women’s Suntech Vent Flip PFG ($35)

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Best for: River Rats
These flip-flops are made for river trips, with drainage ports that effectively shed water and also help cool your feet. The cushioned sole was supportive, but not overbuilt, and the colorful straps added a fun pop to most outfits. Bonus: even after being submersed in water, they didn't get soggy, and they had surprisingly good traction on wet rocks.

OluKai Holomua ($90)

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Best for: Hikers
Developed in partnership with the Hawaiian Lifeguard Association, the adjustable-strap Holomua is technical footwear made for working professionals. Made for hiking through sharp volcanic rocks, its patent-pending, injected-plastic midsole plate is lightweight but protective. Micro hook-and-loop closure and an aluminum buckle let you dial in fit so you don’t lose them in a swell.

Sanuk Tiki Block ($24)

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Best for: Loungers
Sanuks’s Tiki Block is light on technical features, but heavy on comfort and smiley faces (hundreds of which are embossed into the EVA sole). The rubber strap is comfortable, and the sole will last longer than the drug-store version of a simlar shoe.

Ecco Colin Thong ($90)

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Best for: Party Animals
The closest thing to a dress flip-flop we’ve seen, the Colin has a distressed leather strap and lining. It’s perforated for breathability, with a microfiber footbed that won’t trap sweat. The direct-injected polyurethane sole won’t compress as quick as an EVA midsole, and of all the flip-flops we tested, this one offered the most support.

Teva Original Flip ($30)

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Best for: Raft Guides
Teva was the first to make technical flip-flops, and its Original is still a great buy. The nylon-webbing strap serves as a spot of color above the textured EVA topsole that molds to your feet as you walk. I found these shoes had the grippiest outsole of any other flip-flop I tested, not surprising considering these were originally designed for raft guides.

Chaco Reversiflip ($60)

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Best for: Travelers
The Reversiflips have everything you love about your Chaco sandals—good arch support and durability—but you can swap out the straps (which takes about a minute) whenever you want. The shoes come with black straps; colored straps are sold separately ($20). Choose from green/purple, blue/orange, and pink/yellow solid and print packages. They’re the only pair of shoes you’ll need on your next vacation—pack the right straps, and they’ll match any outfit.

$60 for the shoes; $20 for the straps.

Birkenstock Habana Oiled Leather Como ($110)

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Best for: Hippies
Birkenstock slip-ons have been a hippie staple since the 1960s. But it’s not just because they were the first sandals with structure. Birkenstock’s cork and natural-latex footbed is contoured to improve your posture and take stress of your back and knees. A toe bar gives your digits something to hold onto—grip and flex your toes to improve circulation and your balance, according to Birkenstock. 

Propet Harrison ($70)

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Best for: Recovering Athletes
Walking involves half of your body’s muscles and bones, along with numerous joints and ligaments. And if you’re suffering from any injuries, you could be putting additional stresses on certain parts of your body doing even this simple activity. Enter Rejuve’s sandals, whose topsole is designed to improve your posture, stabilize your gait, and supposedly reduce joint pain. This Nubuck leather thong has sweat-wicking neoprene lining in the upper and a cushy EVA midsole over a high-traction outsole.

Combat Flips Tuck Tuck ($70)

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Best for: Do-Gooders
Combat flip-flops aren’t designed for covert beach ops. The company was founded by a veteran who wanted to create job opportunities for entrepreneurs in areas affected by conflict. Afghanistan’s loud, flashy taxis inspired the bright-colored Tuck Tuck, which was made in Bogota, Columbia. Red, green, and blue with yellow stitching, it’ll get some attention. The Tuck Tuck has a cowhide leather deck and thong, a medium-density EVA midsole, and sturdy rubber tread.

Freewaters Scamp ($40)

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Best for: Sore Soles
The best thing about the Scamp is the squishy, springy, shock-absorbing Therm-a-Rest footbed. Bedroom slipper comfortable, the ribs massage your feet as you walk. The Scamp footbed absorbs some water when submersed, but take a few steps and it squeezes out. I found the soft webbing straps never chafed the top of my foot.

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Tested: Maximalist Shoes of 2014

There are few debates more polarized in the running world than the one between maximalists and minimalists. It seems everyone either subscribes to the super-cushioned cult or the minimal movement, and there’s not much common ground in between.

After the minimalist craze of the past few years, more top shoe brands are entering the maximalist fray. So we reviewed the latest beefed-up options to get to the bottom of the dispute. Or at least add more fuel to the flame.

Hoka One One Conquest ($170)

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Intended for: Road

This is the Cadillac of road runners. The Conquest—the latest edition from the brand known for its trademark giant foam—is Hoka’s first attempt at a road shoe. Perched on a 29mm stack, the Conquest has twice the cushion of most normal road trainers. This makes it a great option for runners who log a lot of miles and want some extra cush or for those returning from injury.

Noticeably narrower and slightly less cumbersome than Hoka’s trail-shoe options, the Conquest still has a boxy, stilt-like effect. With that said, it’s also astonishingly stable thanks to a new Rmat® midsole-suspended cradle system that cups your foot. This shoe is laterally stiff and so cushioned that there's very little ground-feel, which might turn off some runners.

I found the shoe to be quite comfortable thanks to a seamless upper. Take note: the collar and tongue are uncushioned, and although I didn't have any problems with this, it could chafe some runners. All the more reason to try before you buy. The Conquest's Race-Lace system (similar to Salomon's Speedlaces) did cut into the top of my foot, but this was easily fixed by swapping in a pair of normal laces (included with every pair of shoes).  

The Conquest’s 4mm drop and rockered forefoot accelerate your transition from ground-strike to push-off, delivering on the promised feeling of “weightlessness.” Hoka devotees will notice the new foam is less plush than that in other Hokas, but this shoe is still a great combination of cushion and responsiveness for the road. Alberto Salazar told us, ”The more you run, the more support your foot needs.” This is a big-mileage shoe for any road runner looking to extend their long run in search of racing glory.

Important note: Hokas run at least a half size larger than the number on the box, so be sure to try these on for sizing before you buy.

Weight: 11.8 oz.; Drop: 4mm; Geometry: 25/29mm

Brooks Transcend ($160)

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Intended for: Road

The Brooks Transcend, the company’s first foray into the maximalist market, looks a bit like it arrived on a spaceship from the future. The Brooks Super DNA midsole is 25 percent more cushioned than any of Brooks’ other offerings. Its rounded heel and 8mm drop helps you roll through your gait cycle and allows the shoe to maintain Brooks’ quick-footed lightweight feel. It’s a traditional road shoe that doesn’t compromise its midsole responsiveness for unnecessary cushion. 

For this shoe Brooks departed from a traditional shoe post—designed to keep you in proper biomechanical alignment—in favor of a new technology it calls “Guide Rails” to protect against pronation and supination. These rails are specialized plates along the upper on the outside of the shoe. The rails act like bumpers, so if your foot doesn't roll in or out, you won't notice them. If it does, they'll keep you from over-pronating or over-supinating.

The shoe’s plush upper feels downright luxurious, but I found the shoe could use a little more room in the toe-box. Runners with narrow feet shouldn't have any problem with the fit, but if you have wide feet, definitely try before you buy. The Transcend is a wonderful option for a focused road runner who wants a bit more cushion, but who isn't ready to make the jump to a Hoka One One.

Weight: 12.2 oz.; Drop: 8mm; Geometry: 22/30mm

Altra Olympus ($130)

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Intended for: Trail

Named after a peak on the edge of the Salt Lake valley, the Altra Olympus is the first maximally cushioned, zero-drop shoe. The heel is at the same height as your forefoot, as it would be if you were running barefoot. Altra believes this promotes proper biomechanics.

The wide toe box allows your toes to naturally splay, good for anyone with wide feet or runners who battle neuromas. The foot feel is soft and slipper-like, even without socks (if you choose to go that route). 

The Olympus forefoot rocker—like a early-rise ski tip—helps initiate your stride. And the Olympus’ wide platform makes it a very stable ride despite its relatively high stack height. If you charge downhill, or hope to, the Olympus will gobble up terrain like no other. The price for that, however, is less return of energy from the midsole. At times this shoe feels like riding uphill on your big travel freeride bike: the shock absorption is great until you have to climb. That means it can have a wet-shoe feel on the flats.

Our major gripe? The Olympus' tread looks more like what you'd expect on a road shoe. It wasn’t tacky enough for rock, and it wasn’t toothy enough for steep dirt trails. Finally, I found its tongue needed to be a bit longer and wider, or it needed an offset loop, to keep debris out. On long runs, I inevitably got rocks in the shoe.

Weight: 11 oz.; Drop: 0mm; Geometry: 32mm

New Balance Fresh Foam 980 ($110)

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Intended for: Road

Of all the new maximal shoes this year, the Fresh Foam 980 doesn’t feel like it belongs in the super-cush category. It has the slimmest profile of the crop and really doesn’t comply with it’s marketing copy of “soft, pillowy, and cloudlike.” What this shoe lacks in “pillowy” however, it makes up for in proprioception. That means it provides superior ground-feel than its competitors. Combine that with how light this shoe is, and you have a fast, lightly cushioned racer. 

Fresh Foam 980’s 4mm drop encourages a mid-foot strike and a quick cadence. A comfortable fit with a thick cushioned tongue, it features an elegant single-piece midsole and outsole that provide long-term durability (a technique made possible by new 3D-printing technology). The breathable upper uses welded overlays to eliminate seams and possible hot spots for blisters. It has a narrow forefoot, and sizes a little small—you should probably size up at least a half size when you buy.

The Fresh Foam 980 is the fleetest maximal shoe on the market today. It’s super responsive, light, cushioned, and wonderfully flexible for a maximal shoe with a lot of midsole. When your training volume increases and your long runs get really long, this is the high-mileage workhorse you’ll be happy to own. 

Weight: 8.8 oz.; Drop: 4mm; Geometry: 22/26mm

Vasque Ultra ShapeShifter ($170)

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Intended for: Trail

The “Ultra” in the name denotes who this shoe was made for—ultrarunners. The super-cushioned ShapeShifter subverts the traditional construction methods (and associated construction waste) by attaching the shoe’s upper directly to a one-piece injection-molded EVA outsole. This method eliminates the midsole and the insole entirely. Take note: that also means this shoe won't work for those who run with orthotics.

The Ultra ShapeShifter features a roomy stretch mesh sock upper and the Boa L5 lacing system. The latter is brilliant for on-the-run customization, and anyone who prefers their shoes loose for uphills and tight for downhills. Simply bend down and twist the mechanism to tighten your shoe to your preferred snugness. Because the laces are thin (about the size of fishing wire), they can cut into the top of your foot if they're too tight. 

The one-piece sole is malleable and conforms to the trail, and I found it gave me great traction even on loose kitty litter. It’s also a fantastic buffer between you and the hard ground, which increased my downhill running speed. Eliminating the layering comes with the added benefit of giving the ShapeShifter good trail feel for a shoe that lifts you 28mm off the ground. 

The biggest downside: I found the fit to be quite odd. The front of the arch/midfoot was much narrower than any other shoe I've worn. I couldn't run more than a few miles in this shoe, and if you have wide feet, either consider another option or definitely try before you buy. 

Weight: 10.6 oz.; Drop: 6mm; Geometry: 22/28mm

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