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Scott Sports Announces a Brand New Line of Ski Boots

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In 1958, Sun Valley Idaho’s Ed Scott, an engineer and ski racer, invented the first tapered aluminum ski pole. The new aluminum pole replaced bamboo and steel, and launched Scott, which became a leading manufacturer of ski gear.

For Scott, categories have come and gone as the company has changed management over the past 50 years. In 1978, Scott USA went bankrupt. In 1981, the new owners decided to focus the business on ski poles and goggles, where Scott USA was a dominant player.

Recently, Scott renewed its commitment to winter sports in a big way, expanding its line into eyewear, outerwear, protection, skis, bindings (in Europe), and poles. And just today Scott announced that it will launch a new line of boots, including freeski performance, ski mountaineering, and telemark models for winter 2013/14.

A couple of months ago, Scott acquired the ski boot production division of Garmont, including intellectual property, molds, and personnel from Garmont Italy. So it's re-entering the boot category with a proven manufacturing platform and product design team. This isn’t Scott's first foray into ski boots—in 1971, the company made what was then the world’s lightest model. Combining its existing product development team, which has a broad range of experience in bike, run, and moto footwear, with a number of key former Garmont designers, Scott plans to push the envelope of innovation, technology, and design in the ski boot space.

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According to Scott, its boot fit is anatomically correct, close-fitting, and responsive, with all-day comfort. Scott shells were developed around the foot for lightning lateral response with a smooth, progressive forward flex in a variety of stiffnesses for different skier weights and skiing styles.

“The Scott name is known for superior design and quality, and our ski boots are no exception,” says Scott Sports owner and CEO Beat Zaugg. “Each and every detail in our boots is designed to increase performance for the customer, which stays true to Scott’s inherent need to provide usable and technically advanced products for our customers. Ski boots are an expansion of the Scott brand, and with the incorporation of cutting-edge technology, will pave the way toward new trends in footwear.”

Scott's Freeski Big Mountain Delirium is the “all-in-one” of freeride boots. Powerful, progressively flexed, potent. The last guarantees plenty of room in the forefoot, while offering a secure heel for solid edge control. The High Overlap transmits power directly to the medial mid-foot, exactly where you need it for precise ski control. Soles are eaasily interchangeable, snapped-in and secured with three bolts per boot; $800.

Scott’s Cosmos is a four-buckle boot that achieves harmony between the two key needs of the ski mountaineer: light weight and confidence-inspiring. This model if perfect for big tours, with an anatomical last, superior Instant Comfort EZ Fit liner, and shock dampening shell inserts; $750.

Available fall 2013, $600 and up; scott-sports.com.

—Berne Broudy
@berneb



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