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Dispatches : Photography

Double Agents: Jeremy Weinman

For Jeremy Weinman, 35, triathlete and director of operations at Dodocase, which produces handmade tablet, phone, and laptop cases, the link between the tech industry and racing is the challenge of the unknown. “When you’re running a marathon or out on an Ironman course, you have to be ready for the unexpected—dehydration, a flat tire, weather, injury,” says Weinman, who finished the 2011 Canada Ironman in just under 12 hours. In tech, adaptability is essential for success, which is part of the reason Dodocase assembles its cases in San Francisco. “It keeps operations flexible and allows us to respond more efficiently to new products,” says Weinman.

Style Credits: Ludlow Japanese seersucker jacket by J.Crew ($248); Dover Point shirt by Theory ($125); Sodium Taper jeans by All Saints ($145); Minimus Hi-Rez shoes by New Balance ($110)

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Double Agents: Craig dos Santos

Long before minimalist shoes altered the running landscape, Craig dos Santos, 31, made his own. “I used to put my shoes in the oven to heat them up so I could remove the middle layer of padding,” says the former Rice University cross-country and steeplechase competitor. In 2011, he founded Andover Games, which produces mobile apps for clients like National Geographic. These days, he runs in Golden Gate Park before work and fits in the occasional marathon, ultra, or century ride. “Being an endurance athlete and an entrepreneur both put you at the edge of self-discovery,” he says. “In sports, you’re optimizing the way your body works. As an entrepreneur, you’re optimizing business efficiency. Things are constantly changing in both arenas.”

Style Credts: Ludlow cotton jacket ($278) and Slim pants ($148) by J.Crew; ­Amicable Zack ­Sylvain shirt by ­Theory ($185); Minimus 10v2 Trail shoes by New Balance ($110)

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Double Agents: Superhero Athletes of the Tech Industry

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Adventurer of the Year: Supersonic Man Felix Baumgartner

127,852.4 feet: After a massive helium balloon lifts him 24 miles high, Baumgartner opens the hatch to his eight-foot-diameter capsule and launches into the stratosphere.

91,316 feet: Fifty seconds into free fall, Baumgartner reaches his top speed of 843.6 miles per hour and becomes the first person to break the sound barrier with his body, creating a sonic boom that’s caught on amateur video from the ground.

75,000 feet: Baumgartner enters into an uncontrolled flat spin—one of the greatest concerns going into the mission, since G forces can cause blackouts. After 13 seconds he regains control.

8,400 feet: Baumgartner pulls his chute after four minutes and 20 seconds of free fall.

Touchdown: Forty-five miles east of Roswell, New Mexico, Baumgartner lands safely, drops to his knees, and raises a hand in triumph for the cameras.

For more, read Ryan Krogh's feature story Bull Shot.

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