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  • Photo: Martin Plsek/Shutterstock

    From the pre-ride shave to the post-ride recovery, we’ve got you covered

    Ali Carr Troxell

  • VeloBody Shave Stick

    Photo: Courtesy of Velobody

    VeloBody Shave Stick

    Leave it to a former Microsoft Product Manager and bike fanatic in Seattle to come up with an alternative to traditional shaving cream. VeloBody’s Shave Stick eliminates the worry about parabens and petroleum because it’s made with moisturizing goat’s milk. Its stick form makes it easy to toss in a race bag or a suitcase and there’s no chance of it exploding when you touch down on the other side. Paired with a good razor, it gave us a super-close, smooth shave. $9.95 for 2.5 oz

  • Rapha Post Shave Lotion

    Photo: Courtesy of Rapha

    Rapha Post Shave Lotion

    No other lotion is as specially formulated specifically for cyclists. Rapha’s Post Shave Lotion—which is as good on the face as it is on the legs—not only moisturizes thanks to aloe and black oat ingredients, but a special cocoa extract actually helps slow hair growth to help you go longer between shaves. What’s more? The lotion fights aging with ingredients like chitin and lupin seed extract which promote natural healing and collagen, respectively. Plus, we love its minty cooling sensation on freshly shaved skin. $30 for 5 oz

  • Juniper Ridge Trail Soap

    Photo: Courtesy of Juniper Ridge

    Juniper Ridge Trail Soap

    By using juice presses, converted whiskey stills, steam and copper pipes, Juniper Ridge distills plants they harvest in the wild into some of the most fragrant, rejuvenating soaps on the market. Yes, sometimes the scents can be a little intense (especially when you open the cabinet or drawer you store them in) but they’ll bring you right back to your last ride through the National Forest. Named for where they are harvested, the soap we recommend is the Siskiyou Trail Crew Soap, with fragrance from mushrooms, wood, bark and moss found while hiking near northern California’s Siskiyou region. $35 for 8 oz

  • Beyond Coastal Active Face Stick SPF 30

    Photo: Courtesy of Beyond Coastal

    Beyond Coastal Active Face Stick SPF 30

    Of all of the sunscreens we’ve tried—and believe us when we say we’ve tried a lot—Beyond Coastal’s skin protection does the best job of blocking harmful rays without feeling oily, sticky, or clammy. In fact, most of their products include aloe vera, shea butter, and vitamin E, making our skin feel nourished as well as protected. That’s true for their water-resistant Active Face Stick SPF 30, which goes on easily and rubs in clear. And because it’s in stick form, you can put it on without taking off your cycling gloves or greasing up your grips. $6.99 for .5 oz

  • Ursa Major Face Wipes

    Photo: Courtesy of Ursa Major

    Ursa Major Face Wipes

    Based in Stowe, Vermont, Ursa Major makes high-end, healthy, natural skincare for men, recognizing the fact that men have bigger pores, oilier skin and they sweat more than women. Their Active Face Wipes—scented with rosemary, orange and fir—exfoliate, sooth, and hydrate skin, cleaning it from dirt picked up en route. When you need a quick refresher out there on the road, rip open one of these packs, wipe your face with the bamboo cloth (it’s soft!) and it’ll revitalize you as much as rinsing your face in a clear stream. 20 for $24

  • Soigneur Embrocation

    Photo: Courtesy of Soigneur

    Soigneur Embrocation

    It’s no surprise that Soigneur concocted their shea butter-based Embrocation with just enough black pepper extract to give your legs the right amount of warmth and protection from the cold—they hail from Michigan after all. Made in the USA, their Embrocation product has a touch of menthol, which kept us smelling good well into our ride and we liked using it after to soothe tired muscles. $15 for 4 oz

  • Louis Garneau Chamois Cream

    Photo: Courtesy of Louis Garneau

    Louis Garneau Chamois Cream

    Made by one of the most established cycling brands on the market, Louis Garneau created their Chamois Cream in collaboration with their Quebecor team to ensure it’s exactly what a cyclist would want. And it is: it reduces friction and prevents irritation like the best out there thanks to all natural ingredients like vitamin E, silk proteins, calendula, arnica and peppermint oils, and menthol. It’s paraben-free and pairs well with synthetic and leather chamois. $15 for 4 oz

  • Assos Skin Repair Gel

    Photo: Courtesy of Assos

    Assos Skin Repair Gel

    Sometimes, you just can’t avoid friction its uncomfortable aftermath. But you can speed up the healing process. Assos, the Swiss-based company that developed the first Lycra cycling shorts in 1976, came up with a solution: Skin Repair Gel that promotes the circulation process to heal skin faster. It’s free of alcohol, color additives, perfumes and preservatives and just plain old feels good. $40 for 2.5 oz

  • Epicuren Aloe Vera Calming Gel

    Photo: Courtesy of Epicuren

    Epicuren Aloe Vera Calming Gel

    When sunburn gets you, reach for Epicuren’s Aloe Vera Calming Gel, which contains a mix extracts from aloe, green tea, grapefruit and cucumber to calm your skin. The company was started based on enzyme research done on severally scarred burn victims twenty years ago and has been innovating and developing every since using the same theories. But that’s just talk—what matters is that the Calming Gel feels cool and refreshing on freshly sunburned skin and speeds up the healing process. $10 for 2 oz

  • Jason Cooling Minerals and Tea Tree Muscle Pain Therapy

    Jason Cooling Minerals and Tea Tree Muscle Pain TherapyJason’s Cooling Minerals and Tea Tree Muscle Pain Therapy cream is made with natural pain relieving and anti-inflammatory ingredients, like tea tree oil, to relax your achy joints and muscle tweaks. It works—we rubbed this on after a full day on the saddle and it relieved knee joint pain long enough to cycle home from the local brewery. Avocado, evening primrose and hazelnut all work to moisturize as well. $9 for 4 oz

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