November 7, 2013

Beer sampler     Photo: Melissa Fiene/Thinkstock

Trending: Beers With a Local Taste

Craft brews highlight native ingredients

A trend in craft brewing has beer makers seeking out local flavors to connect individual brews to their surroundings. NPR News reports that brewers are headed into their own backyards in search of ingredients like leaves, roots, berries, and even fungi to create a uniquely local taste.

The movement has even created groups like Beers Made by Walking, which leads hikes in search of pint filling ingredients. Large breweries like Deschutes and New Belgium have even participated in the walking hunts.

Small breweries like Desert Eagle Brewery in Salt Lake City are hiking into the mountains in search of wild hops. And Uncommon Brewers in Santa Cruz makes a red ale using maple-scented candy cap mushrooms.

Video: Brew Dogs making beer on a keg-boat in Portland, OR.

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A rendering of the Amager Resource Center in Copenhagen. The trash incinerator will have a functioning ski resort on its roof.     Photo: Courtesy of BIG

Literally Skiing on Garbage

Building a trash incinerator-cum-resort

Soon, a vacation to Copenhagen won’t be complete without a few runs down the the city’s garbage incinerator. Amager Bakke, a waste-management company in Denmark, is building a power plant that doubles as a fully-functioning, 2.7-acre ski resort, complete with black-diamond runs.

“We propose to turn the roof of the new Amager Resource Center into an artificial ski slope for the citizens of Copenhagen, where it will be possible to ski all year round!” wrote Bjarke Ingels Group, the international architecture firm working on the design, on the project’s website.

The slope will begin at the top of the building, 280 feet in the air, and slope all the way to ground level where skiers can take an elevator back to the top. The project broke ground in March, and first tracks are expected by spring 2017.

See the building in Google Earth (requires Google Earth)

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Trampolines: Fun for kids, not so much for elk.     Photo: Suzanne Tucker / Shutterstock.com

Watch: Elk Stuck On Trampoline

Oh, deer.

Presumably, safety nets are placed around trampolines to keep kids from bouncing out. Turns out those nets are also pretty good at keeping elk in.

Greg Chase and family, of Evergreen, Colorado, learned this first-hand when an elk herd wandered into their yard earlier this week. “We were just sitting down for our morning coffee,” says Chase, who captured the incident and posted it on YouTube. “I watched this young elk poking his head into the entrance of the trampoline, when all of a sudden he decided to jump in for some fun.”

We’re not sure “fun” is the right word—the elk looks more panicked than thrilled to be on the trampoline—but at least it escaped without injury or being shot (as was suggested by Chase’s wife at one point).

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The Grand Canyon's South Rim     Photo: Tony in WA/Flickr

Grand Canyon Uranium Mine Delayed

Due to falling prices and litigation

The proposed reopening of a uranium mine near the Grand Canyon is on hold in the face of falling uranium prices and ongoing litigation.

The old mine, six miles south of the South Rim entrance to the canyon, is one of the "zombie mines" that the federal government has given energy producers approval to reopen despite the Obama administration banning new hard-rock mining in areas over 1 million acres, since the rights of the mine date back to when it was closed two decades ago.

Before it was stalled, the mining company, Energy Fuels Resources Inc., planned to extract 83,000 tons of ore to produce 1.6 million pounds of processed uranium in 2015, reports The Colorado Springs Gazette.

The company had planned to start extracting 83,000 tons of ore to produce 1.6 million pounds of processed uranium, or yellow cake, in 2015 but now will have to re-evaluate the timeframe.
Read more at http://gazette.com/work-for-uranium-mine-near-grand-canyon-hits-pause/article/feed/59807#FOsX4uSkOl1Rjb2s.99
The company had planned to start extracting 83,000 tons of ore to produce 1.6 million pounds of processed uranium, or yellow cake, in 2015 but now will have to re-evaluate the timeframe.
Read more at http://gazette.com/work-for-uranium-mine-near-grand-canyon-hits-pause/article/feed/59807#FOsX4uSkOl1Rjb2s.99

Grand Canyon officials have warned that uranium mining could contaminate scarce water resources in the area. To protect the land, Havasupai Indian tribe and a coalition of environmental groups sued the U.S. Forest Service in 2012 over what they argue is the anachronistic use of a 1986 environmental review. 

Prices for uranium have also dropped to the among the lowest in the last five years, at mid-$30 per pound, resulting in Energy Fuels Resources Inc. putting the re-opening on hold until December 2014 or whenever the federal case is decided.

Energy Fuels Resources Inc. said the operation will be on standby until December 2014 or until a ruling is issued in a federal case challenging the U.S. Forest Service's decision to allow development of the Canyon Mine near Tusayan
Read more at http://gazette.com/work-for-uranium-mine-near-grand-canyon-hits-pause/article/feed/59807#vs5QZ7kQRqBT8KpY.99
Energy Fuels Resources Inc. said the operation will be on standby until December 2014 or until a ruling is issued in a federal case challenging the U.S. Forest Service's decision to allow development of the Canyon Mine near Tusayan
Read more at http://gazette.com/work-for-uranium-mine-near-grand-canyon-hits-pause/article/feed/59807#vs5QZ7kQRqBT8KpY.99
Energy Fuels Resources Inc. said the operation will be on standby until December 2014 or until a ruling is issued in a federal case challenging the U.S. Forest Service's decision to allow development of the Canyon Mine near Tusayan
Read more at http://gazette.com/work-for-uranium-mine-near-grand-canyon-hits-pause/article/feed/59807#vs5QZ7kQRqBT8KpY.99

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