March 7, 2013

    Photo: JRWhitaker1/Flickr

Intern Killed by Lion in California

24-year-old fatally attacked

Dianna Hanson, a 24-year-old intern at a Fresno, California, wild cat sanctuary, was killed Wednesday after being attacked by a lion. Hanson, who moved from Washington to California to work at the Cat Haven sanctuary, climbed into the cage of a four-year-old male lion and was then fatally attacked.

Beyond that, not much more information is known. Officials have released few details, and an autopsy is scheduled for today.

The Fresno County Sheriff's Department reported receiving the emergency call shortly before 12:30 p.m. Friends of the workers said the routine is to feed the cats about noon. The usual method is to go into a small enclosure, leave the food, get out, then let the animals inside from a larger enclosure. According to the sanctuary's guidelines, caregivers should never be inside with the big cats.

The more experienced volunteer repeatedly tried to coax the lion—a four-year-old male named Cous Cous—into another enclosure, away from the victim, officials said. Police fatally shot the animal before rushing to Hanson, according to Sheriff's Department officials, but she was pronounced dead at the scene.

Next time you consider complaining about an internship, just shut up and go get the damn coffee.

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    Photo: Bill David Brooks

Tennis Adopts Biological Passport

Nadal urges transparency

Tennis will adopt the biological passport system used by cycling, track, and other sports to catch athletes using performance-enhancing drugs. The International Tennis Federation said on Thursday that it would be implementing the program, which uses known data about an athlete's blood profile to monitor for sudden changes that could be the result of drugs, this year.

While tennis has been spared the mass doping scandals that have plagued cycling, a few high-profile players have been caught using drugs. Last month, Czech player Barbora Zahlavova Strycova was banned for six months after testing positive for a prohibited stimulant. In an interview with the Associated Press, 11-time Grand Slam winner Rafael Nadal urged authorities to make sure the new testing program was transparent.

"The important thing is that those who are cheating, pay for their cheating," he said. "With Armstrong, the image of sport has been damaged, especially in the case of cycling. The important thing is for sport to clean up its image, that the controls are made public."

Via The Guardian

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Moose poaching is not uncommon and has taken a toll on populations.     Photo: D G Brown/Flickr

Teens Charged With Moose Poaching

Facing fines of $735

A cow moose was found dead February 19 after officials received tips about a calf following an injured mother. The cruel killing orphaned the calf, which was spooked when officials tried to approach. Even worse, the cow had been bred and would have given birth again this spring.

Two 15-year-old boys were charged with taking a moose during closed hunting season. Their names have not been released because they are juveniles, but they are set to be tried in Powell County Justice Court on March 15. If convicted the boys could have their hunting and trapping licenses suspended for two years and face fines of $735 each.

Moose are one of those iconic animals that everybody likes and people hated to see this happen," said Joe Kambic, a game warden for the MT Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks.

Via KRTV

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