Ethiopia's Super Food

Is teff the new quinoa?

Injera, the spongy flatbread used scoop up stew at Ethiopian restaurants is made from ground teff seeds.     Photo: Getty Images

Ethiopia is not exactly known for it's abundance of food—it’s one of the world's poorest countries. But each year, 6.3 million farmers cultivate teff, an ancient, nutrient-rich grain that might give quinoa a run for its money.

Teff's tiny seeds are packed with iron, calcium, protein, and amino acids—and they're naturally gluten-free.

And as western consumers begin to notice teff's super-food properties, the Ethiopian government hopes to double teff production by 2015, according to the Guardian. Ethiopia's farmers also hope to benefit from its newfound popularity.

"Teff is second nature to an Ethiopian; so who better to supply it?" says Sophie Kebede, a London-based business owner specializing in teff. "We have this sought after grain being grown in the country, so why can't an Ethiopian farmer benefit from this?"

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