How to Survive a Month Underwater

Jacques Cousteau's grandson sets record for days submerged in the sea

Jacques Costeau Fabien Costeau Florida International Universit Aquarius

There's Fabien, perhaps contemplating his grandfather's metaphorically on-point words, "The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever."     Photo: Earth Island Journal/Flickr

Back on June 4, we reported that Fabien Cousteau, grandson of the famed red knit-cap-wearing oceanophile Jacques Cousteau, was going to spend 31 days underwater with his crew off the Florida Keys. Yesterday, Fabien resurfaced after spending all of June in Aquarius, the world's only underwater laboratory, which is operated by Florida International University.
“It was amazing how much it felt like home,” Cousteau told the media, five hours after seeing daylight for the first time in over a month. “I can imagine for someone who doesn’t like tight spaces it could be much more difficult.”
The project, dubbed Mission 31, was undertaken to collect research of the ocean environment, while raising awareness for marine conservation. With the successful completion of his endeavor, Cousteau the younger (and two tenacious scientists who also stuck it out) now holds the record for the time continuously spent submerged in the big blue. Fabien bested his grandfather's record by one day, although it is unlikely that he will ever match Jacques verbal acuity.
"A lot of men attack the sea," he once said. "I make love to it."

Back on June 4, we reported that Fabien Cousteau, grandson of famed red knit cap-wearing oceanophile Jacques Cousteau, was going to spend 31 days underwater with his crew off the Florida Keys. Yesterday, Fabien resurfaced after spending all of June in Aquarius, the world's only underwater laboratory, operated by Florida International University.

"It was amazing how much it felt like home," Cousteau told the Guardian, five hours after seeing daylight for the first time in more than a month. "I can imagine for someone who doesn't like tight spaces it could be much more difficult."

The project, dubbed Mission 31, collected research on the ocean environment while raising awareness for marine conservation. With the successful completion of his endeavor, Cousteau the younger (plus two tenacious scientists who also stuck it out 63 feet below the ocean's surface) now holds the record for time continuously spent submerged in the big blue. Fabien beat his grandfather's record by one day, although it is unlikely he will ever match Jacques's verbal acuity.

"A lot of men attack the sea," Cousteau Sr. once said. "I make love to it."

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