September 4, 2013

    Photo: miqu77/Shutterstock.com

Armstrong Ordered to Testify

Details regarding his ex-wife and UCI presidents

A Texas judge has ordered Lance Armstrong to reveal who knew about his doping, possibly including his ex-wife and two former UCI presidents by the end of September. Travis County District Judge Tim Sulak gave the order last week as part of a lawsuit being filed against the cyclist by Acceptance Insurance Holding.

Acceptance is attempting to recover $3 million in bonuses it paid Armstrong from 1999 to 2001 by proving that Armstrong and his associates committed fraud. The company aims to find when UCI Presidents Hein Verbruggen and Pat McQuaid along with ex-wife Kristin Armstrong learned about his doping, the Associated Press reports.

In the USADA report on Armstrong, three of his former teammates testified that Kristin Armstrong knew about his doping. The trial is set for next April.

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    Photo: Alamy

South American 'Nutcracker' Fish Found in Paris

Known for its dangerous bite

The Brazilian pacu fish, better known by its nickname, the Nutcracker, has been found Paris’s River Seine. The omnivorous fresh-water fish, mostly found in South America, is closely related to the piranha and can grow up to several feet long and 55 pounds in the wild.

A Paris fisherman called the river police after reeling in one of the frightening creatures last Friday morning. The fish was likely dumped in the river by an exotic aquarium owner after it had outgrown its tank. “He sent us an image of the picture through his smart phone and it turned out to be a Pacu,” said a police spokesman. “It is a fish with a very dangerous bite.”

Unlike their piranha cousins, the pacu have square, almost human-looking teeth, and a reputation for biting the dangling testicles of swimmers. When a pacu was found in Denmark last month, authorities consulted Copenhagen University professor Peter Rask Moller, who advised swimmers to “keep their pants on until we know if there are more of these fish out in our brackish waters.”

If there are more pacu in the Seine, they will likely die off as temperatures begin to drop.

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    Photo: Fayes4Art/Flickr

Croc Holds Man Hostage On Island for Weeks

Feared being eaten alive

A kayaker was rescued off the northern coast of Western Australia last weekend after being stalked by an enormous crocodile for two weeks. Ryan Blair had been dropped off by boat to explore the area in his kayak, but was unable to leave because he feared being eaten by the "very, very large crocodile," his rescuer, Don MacLeod told Australia's ABC News.

Each time he attempted to escape the island, the creature would move nearer to the kayaker. “He was about four meters away from me, and I thought, ‘This is it,’” the 37-year-old told Australia’s 9news. "It was so close, and if this croc wanted to take me it would not have been an issue. I was scared for my life. I was hard-core praying for God to save me."

Blair tried to signal passing aircraft and boats, but his efforts were unsuccessfull until he was spotted by boatman MacLeod, who is familiar with the large creature. “One day he just happened to surface alongside me as I was going past and my boat's 20 foot long so he was well up towards the 20-foot mark," MacLeod said. “I've seen him several times actually going by quite fast."

After rescuing the tourist, MacLeod gave him a cold beer, "Which was probably the wrong thing to do."

Only 24 hours after saving the kayaker, MacLeod helped another man whose boat was under attack by a crocodile. "He went up to get some water for his yacht to continue his journey in his little tender, rowed it up and on the way back a croc grabbed it and shook it and punched some large holes in it so he managed to get back here and we pulled it up and patched it up with some putty."

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