lifting

The DEA said it discovered 16 underground steroid labs, 134,000 steroid dosage units, 636 kilograms of raw steroid powder, 8,200 liters of raw steroid injectable liquid, and over $2 million in U.S. currency and assets in the course of their investigations.     Photo: iStock

DEA Announces Crackdown on Anabolic Steroids

90 people arrested

The DEA arrested 90 people connected to over 30 different U.S. investigations into the global trade of performance-enhancing drugs, according to an agency press release on Tuesday. The investigations and enforcement, which the DEA is calling Operation Cyber Juice, were carried out in 20 U.S. states in cooperation with the Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, Europol, US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), and the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). The main focus, in the majority of cases, was on the sale and trafficking of anabolic steroids, a large portion of which originated in China.

“By partnering with USADA and the DEA in this major steroid operation, WADA has been able to prevent potentially harmful steroid substances from getting into the hands of athletes looking for an edge,” WADA Director General David Howman said in the press release. “This is a good example of anti-doping and law enforcement working well together to further their own efforts of reducing doping and protecting public health.”

In its announcement, the DEA said it discovered 16 underground steroid labs, 134,000 steroid dosage units, 636 kilograms of raw steroid powder, 8,200 liters of raw steroid injectable liquid, and over $2 million in U.S. currency and assets in the course of their investigations. Four of those labs were found in Arizona, along with 150,000 steroid pills and 5,000 vials, according to Fox 10 Phoenix.

“Too many young people are ruining their lives and damaging their bodies from steroid abuse,” DEA Acting Administrator Chuck Rosenberg said in the press release. “Through Operation Cyber Juice, DEA is attacking the global underground steroid market, exposing its danger and lies.”

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Sierra Nevada

A California firm has been ordered to stop tapping local springs for bottled water.     Photo: Sterling College / Flickr

California Orders Firm to Stop Drawing from Sierra Springs

Tanker trucks caught on video

On Wednesday, California Water Resources Control Board officials ordered Sugar Pine Spring Water to stop tapping water sources in the Sierra Nevada for bottling and selling, according to the AP. Regulators captured tanker trucks entering and leaving one of Sugar Pine’s plants on video. 

Kathy Mrowka, the enforcement manager of the Water Resources Control Board, told the AP that Sugar Pine is the first commercial water bottling company that the state has pursued legal action against this year. The proposed sanctions include a nearly $225,000 fine for unlawfully collecting and transporting water to bottling plants for the past two years.

The state has proposed fines against multiple irrigation districts, including a $1.5 million dollar fine against the Byron-Bethany Irrigation District that is currently being challenged, according to the New York Times​Crystal Geyser Water Co. plans to tap an aquifer in Siskiyou County, despite local opposition. The springs that Sugar Pine tapped are within the state’s jurisdiction because they are surface waters as opposed to groundwaters, California water board spokesman Tim Moran told the AP. But the state cannot intervene with Crystal Geyser Water Co.'s tapping location because groundwater regulations will not be finalized for years.

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Nepal Has Yet to Spend $4 Billion in Relief Funds

A Nepalese man sits near the debris after the earthquake in Bhaktapur near Kathmandu, Nepal on April 26.     Photo: Photo: AP

Nepal Has Yet to Spend $4 Billion in Relief Funds

After earthquakes, 2.5 million are still in need of food, shelter, medical care

Four months after two earthquakes killed upwards of 8,800 people in Nepal, and two months after international agencies agreed to donate $4 billion to help the country rebuild, the Nepali government hasn’t spent any of that money on reconstruction, Reuters reported Wednesday.

Govind Raj Pokharel, chief executive officer of the National Reconstruction Authority, told Reuters that the Nepali government, which hasn’t made arrangements to receive the funds, probably won’t spend the relief money until October. He said there were concerns about building during monsoon season, as well as delays in approving reconstruction plans.

About 2.5 million people in the country are still in need of food, shelter, and medical care, including many in remote areas, according to the United Nations. Maili Pariyar, 50, who is living in a tent in Kathmandu, told Reuters she has not received aid from the government.

"We have lost everything. We are desperate," she said. "How much longer do we have to wait for help?"

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