Barack Obama

President Obama will appear on Running Wild with Bear Grylls.     Photo: Steve Jurvetson / Flickr

Obama to Guest Star on 'Bear Grylls'

To highlight the impacts of climate change in the Arctic

President Obama will join survival expert and television personality Bear Grylls for an episode of NBC’s Running Wild with Bear Grylls, according to NBC News. NBC and the White House announced on Monday that the two will trek through the Alaskan wilderness to highlight the impacts of climate change in the Arctic.

Obama will travel to the Alaskan Arctic on Monday—the first sitting U.S. President to do so—and plans to meet with coastal fisherman and hike on a receding glacier near Seward, according to CNN.

Obama’s trek with Bear Grylls has yet to be scheduled, but the episode will air before the end of the year.

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Mount McKinley Will Be Renamed Denali

“For generations, Alaskans have known this majestic mountain as ‘the great one.’”     Photo: Nic McPhee / Flickr

Mount McKinley Will Be Renamed Denali

Its original Alaska Native name

On Sunday, President Obama announced that he will officially change the name of Mount McKinley to Denali, according to the New York Times. Denali, the original Alaska Native name for the mountain that means "the high one" or "the great one," was renamed Mount McKinley in the late 19th century in honor of President William McKinley. The change has been the source of controversy for decades, and efforts to change the name back to Denali began in 1975. 

In 1980, the surrounding national park was named Denali National Park and Preserve, but the mountain itself remained Mount McKinley. 

Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan, both Republican Senators from Alaska, introduced legislation earlier this year to rename the mountain Denali

“For generations, Alaskans have known this majestic mountain as ‘the great one,’” Murkowaki said in a video released on Sunday. “I’d like to thank the president for working with us to achieve this significant change to show honor, respect and gratitude to the Athabascan people of Alaska.”

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WATCH: Alaskan Grizzly Swats GoPro

After slowly approaching it, the bear swipes at the camera.     Photo: GoPro / YouTube

WATCH: Alaskan Grizzly Swats GoPro

Photographer catches it on film

Last week, GoPro released footage that Brad Josephs, a photographer and wilderness expedition leader in Alaska, caught of a 30-second encounter with a grizzly. After slowly approaching the HERO3+, the bear swipes at the camera. Watch the encounter here:

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U.S. Takes Fewest World Championship Medals in 12 Years

Founded in 1983, the World Championships are held on the odd years between Olympics. In the 15 championships (not contested in ’85 and ’89), the U.S. averaged 21 medals, including 10 golds, per year.     Photo: Grzegorz Jereczek / Flickr

U.S. Takes Fewest World Championship Medals in 12 Years

Finished below Kenya and Jamaica in golds

On Sunday, the last day of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Championships in Beijing, China, the U.S. finished with its lowest medal count since 2003, according to the IAAF.  

Founded in 1983, the World Championships are held on the odd years between Olympics. In the 15 championships (World Championships were not held in ’85 and ’89), the U.S. averaged 21 medals, including 10 golds, per year. 

This year, the U.S. national team concluded with 18 medals, leading the total number over Kenya (16) and Jamaica (12). But both of the latter countries finished with seven golds to the U.S.’s six. The U.S. had previously never been lower than second in overall golds, but came in third this year.

Individual highlights included Ashton Eaton’s world record in the decathlon and a 4x400-meter relay men’s win. But Team USA men were again disqualified in the 4x100-meter relay—the final exchange was out-of-zone—and only one medal was achieved in mid-distance and distance events when Emily Infeld took bronze in the women’s 10,000 meters.

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DiGiulian Is First Woman to Free Climb Magic Mushroom

“I've never tried harder on anything in my life. I am wrecked and can't believe it's real,” DiGiulian wrote on her Facebook page.     Photo: Mary Mecklenburg / Courtesy of Adidas

DiGiulian Is First Woman to Free Climb Magic Mushroom

She and Traversi send route on the North Face of the Eiger

On Saturday, Sasha DiGiulian and Carlo Traversi became the first Americans to free climb Magic Mushroom on the North Face of Switzerland's the Eiger, according to an Adidas press release. DiGiulian was the first woman to complete the route. It took Traversi and DiGiulian three days to complete the 20-pitch climb, graded 5.13a.

 

 

The Eiger’s North Face is the largest north face in the Alps at nearly 6,000 feet tall and is known as the “Murder Wall,” named for its deadliness to mountaineers, according to the New York Times. The team originally intended to climb the route La Paciencia (5.13b and 23 pitches), but bad weather forced them to change plans, Climbing magazine reported. The Magic Mushroom route was first climbed by Roger Schäli and Christoph Hainz in 2007.

DiGiulian is a three-time U.S. National Champion and is the first North American women to climb at a route graded 5.14d, the hardest sport climb known to have been achieved by a woman, according to her website. Traversi is a two-time U.S. sport climbing national champion and has completed several first ascents.

“I've never tried harder on anything in my life," DiGiulian wrote on her Facebook page. "I am wrecked and can't believe it's real."

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