1. New York Times Green Blog

A steady stream of reporting from all corners of the environmental world

New York Times Green Blog     Photo: Courtesy The New York Times

Good for: This blog tops the list for two reasons: reporting and reach.

Written by: The long roster of bloggers includes Matthew Wald on energy and Felicity Barringer on the overall environmental beat.

The New York Times Green Blog has lost some reporters, including Tom Zeller Jr., who absconded for HuffPo earlier this year, but its breadth and quantity of environmental news coverage is still impressive. The reporters are based all around the world and they've got more reach than most other bloggers by virtue of The New York Times’s sway. The news is divvied into four main topics—science, business, politics, and living (otherwise known as a catch all)—so you can zero in on the news most important to you. Sure, you'll find a dud post every once in a while, but most news hits here before it trickles down to other sites.

Sample post: The blog often runs interesting back stories based on reporting done for the newspaper, such as this look at why National Parks concessions provider Xanterra supports a single-use water bottle ban in the parks, even though it profits from the bottles.

Xanterra Parks and Resorts, an operator of lodgings, gift shops and general merchandise stores at national parks from Death Valley to the Grand Canyon, makes tens of millions of dollars selling its wares and lodgings to tourists. A small portion of those sales — maybe half of a percentage point — comes from selling water in plastic bottles.

Why would it want to give that up?

Don’t get Chris Lane started. He is the company’s vice president for environmental affairs, and the word “evangelist” does not fully capture his intensity on the subject of petroleum-based plastic and the harm that he believes it does to the environment.

“This is a big issue for us, and we are trying to proactively address it,” he said in an interview for an article in Thursday’s paper on a decision by the National Park Service director to scuttle a planned water-bottle ban that park personnel, Xanterra and its fellow concessionaire, Delaware North, had spent months preparing for. ...

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