Our Favorite Thru-Hiking Photographer

Our Favorite Thru-Hiking Photographer

Last month, we highlighted a handful of photographers who were creating stunning work while hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. Taiwan-based interior designer and photographer Sie Sin-Ye (@kukud83) stood out. He and his two friends admit they didn’t know much about the PCT beyond the movie Wild when they set out on the trail in May this year, but they carved out a month to tackle as much as they could. Here, Sie Sin-Ye shares some of his favorite shots from the trip.

Montana’s Off-the-Grid Bison Scavengers

Montana’s Off-the-Grid Bison Scavengers

When Yellowstone National Park was created in 1872, hunting was strictly banned within it—even for the the Native Americans who had lived and hunted there for generations. It wasn’t until 2006 that the Nez Perce, Confederated Salish, and Kootenai tribes successfully petitioned the government to be able to hunt bison when they left the park and within the annually regulated cull—a federal initiative started to manage and combat bison from spreading diseases to other livestock outside the park. Every winter, groups of Native American hunters wait near Gardiner, Montana, near the park’s northwest corner, for the herd to leave the park in search of food, so the hunt can begin. Accompanying them are a group of scavengers who collectively call themselves Buffalo Bridge that live off the remains of bison from the hunt. Working with the Native American hunters, Buffalo Bridge members offer their skills and help in field dressing the animal after the kill. They are often given parts of the animal for their work. Photographer Matt Hamon spent a few days with them this winter.

A Guide to the Untold, Beautiful, and Wild Stories of the American West

A Guide to the Untold, Beautiful, and Wild Stories of the American West

Photographer Lucas Foglia’s widely celebrated book, Frontcountry, took him across much of the American West from 2006 to 2013. He captured nearly 60,000 images over that time and narrowed the final selection down to just 60 shots, all of which explored mining and ranching communities and their interaction with the surrounding landscape. Despite his extensive coverage, Foglia thinks many of the stories he came across are still undercovered. He even included a map in the book as an invitation for other photographers and storytellers to use as a resource. Here, Foglia highlights a few storylines from his book that are far from over.

14,000 Miles, 21 National Parks, 1 Airstream, and 10 Stunning Photos

14,000 Miles, 21 National Parks, 1 Airstream, and 10 Stunning Photos

Charleston-based photographer Drew Doggett’s recent project, Shadow’s Alight; Portraits of the American West, is the result of 14,000 miles traveled in a 23-foot airstream, visiting 21 national parks. Doggett has spent much his career photographing foreign places and people whose communities are in imminent danger due to development and a lack of conservation efforts. But he wanted to turn his lens toward his own country. In celebration of 100 years of our National Park Service, Doggett set out to capture some of America’s most classic scenes to see how they’ve changed, how they’ve stayed the same, and ultimately why they’re worth protecting. Here, Doggett shares a few favorites from his recent project.

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