The Cold Warrior

    Photo: Photo by Nigel Cox

Left: Helly Hansen's Stripe Graphic Crew is by far the flashiest base layer we've seen this season ($40; hellyhansen.com). And it's perfectly complemented by Arc'teryx's supersleek Hercules soft shell, which is cut from a highly breathable, weather-resistant fabric made by Polartec ($299; arcteryx.com). Helly Hansen's new Odin line of skiwear makes you look like a badass but keeps yours warm and dry. The three-layer Odin Mountain Jacket ($450) has abrasion-minimizing shoulder reinforcements and a powder skirt that zips into HH's Mountain Pants ($400), creating a completely snowproof outfit. Despite those "the end is nigh" graphics, the 102-mm-waisted Baggy twin tips, by boutique Swiss brand Movement Skis, have a hopeful story: The wood cores are made from sustainably harvested okume, poplar, and beech ($750; movementskis.com). Complete the go-anywhere/ski-everything package with Rossignol's ultrastiff but still comfy Bandit B-Squad Carbons ($800; rossignol.com) and a beefy alpine-touring binding like Naxo's nx21 ($400; bcaccess.com).

Right: Smith's low-profile Varient Brim helmet is the anti-bobblehead, and it meshes seamlessly with most goggles ($150; smithoptics.com). Wear Timberland's SmartWool-lined Trailscape Snowspikes around town or slide on the integrated snow gaiters (not pictured) and head off-trail ($150; timberland.com). The Burton Warhol, a collaboration with the Andy Warhol Foundation, is based on their celebrated all-mountain model, the Custom ($550; burton.com). Joystick Skiing's Spicolli poles are better-priced and better-looking than most aluminum sticks ($40; joystickskiing.com). Spyder's new Racer Glove employs a material that hardens upon impact and instantly becomes malleable again ($150; spyder.com). Switch up your look with Spy Optic's Zed goggles: The lenses are interchangeable, and custom patches adorn the straps ($90; spyoptic.com).

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