A Throwback Road Trip Essential Worth Bringing Back

The teardrop trailer is back to help you rediscover the open road

The Moby 1 XTR fits a queen-size mattress, kitchen, power sources, and adjustable suspension into a portable package.     Photo: Courtesy of Moby1 Expedition Trailers

Americans have an on-again, off-again love affair with teardrop trailers. At the height of the real estate bubble—a 3,000-square-foot home, media room, and eat-in kitchen for every family!—there wasn’t much innovation in the industry. But since the 2008 financial crash, more and more trailers have appeared on the scene. “There’s just something attractive about being fully self-contained and on the road,” says Ashley Grimes, founder of Utah-based Moby 1 Trailers.

Take the So-Cal Krawler, which has a reinforced steel frame, adjustable shocks, and a burly roof rack for gear or a tent ($16,195). And the military-grade Schutt Xventure is a utilitarian beast, with 19 inches of ground clearance ($11,995).

For sheer ruggedness, however, no trailer can compare to the Moby 1 XTR ($18,500). Measuring 54 inches wide and 108 inches deep, and weighing in at 1,600 pounds, it comes equipped with a queen-size mattress, a loaded galley kitchen, multiple rechargeable power sources, and, most important, an adjustable five inches of suspension—because sometimes the open road isn’t so open.

Moby even has add-ons, like a solar package to take it completely off the grid ($350) and a rooftop tent to fit the whole family ($2,400).Grimes knows a guy who’s living in his unit full-time and another who uses the trailer as a beachfront shack. “There’s an inclination to pack them with amenities,” Grimes says. “But the beauty of these trailers is that they force you to be minimalist. You have to get outside to cook and shower and do everything except sleep and read a book.” Now that’s an American dream we can believe in.

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