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  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Frost River’s Echo Trail seat bag ($95) is made entirely by hand on the second floor of the company’s shop in Duluth, Minnesota. And like all waxed-canvas products, it will only look better with age.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    No bells or whistles here: Silca’s Italian-made Pista bicycle pump ($80) is just plain durable. And because every part is replaceable, you’ll never need a new one.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Canadian outerwear company Nobis has a knack for coming up with fresh designs each winter, and the women’s Eve Knit Fargo hat ($65) fits the mold. The exterior is wool and acrylic, the interior is high-quality faux fur, and the combination makes for a perfect après-ski beanie.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Grove, which crafts gadget cases from sustainable materials, makes everything in its Portland, Oregon, offices—including this tree-engraved bamboo iPhone 4/4S case ($99). Custom designs can be had for just $30 extra.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    With Portuguese cotton woven into flannel, L.L. Bean’s 1933 Chamois Cloth shirt ($65) is a near replica of the button-down in its Depression-era catalog. The only update: a slimmer cut.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    iStabilizer’s cinematic Dolly ($60) cradles iPhones, iPods, and other portable video recorders, including GoPros, so the auteur in the family can capture sweet tracking shots on a budget.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Quicksilver’s chambray-and-cotton Ellis Harbor jacket ($98) looks like a shirt, but don’t be fooled. The quilted insulation and jersey-lined pockets make it warm enough for chilly fall nights.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Timex’s Expedition Military Field watch ($65)strikes the right balance between rugged and office appropriate: it’s water-resistant up to 100 meters, and the classic canvas band goes with everything.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    There are two kinds of people in the world: those who think a flask on a bike is a great idea and those who don’t. For the former, get Ahearne’s Custom Engraved flask ($65). The included mount attaches to a frame just like a water-bottle cage.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    The shiny, lightly insulated North Face Mack Moto jacket ($140) looks like it was designed for a night on the town. But with a DWR coating on the nylon exterior, it’s also water-resistant enough to keep you dry in a snowstorm.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    You could spend five times as much on a whizbang GPS, but if the backpacker in your family just wants to map hiking routes, Garmin’s eTrex 10 ($110) gets it done.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Blundstone BootsBecause their burly out-soles can handle just about any abuse—and because they look good enough to wear to fancy dinners—Blundstone’s slip-on boots have long been popular around the office. Now, with the 268 ($150), you get all that plus laces.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    The exercise-friendly Bose SIE2i earbuds ($150) are expensive, but the audio is ultra-crisp, and they won’t budge from your ears on jarring trail runs. The ones shown here, with integrated remote control, are designed for iPhones and iPods; a device-neutral version, the SIE2 ($120), is available, too.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Mountain Khakis’ Utility bag ($125) is made of thick waxed canvas, and the handle is recycled climbing rope, so it’s both durable and tasteful.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    What are the holidays without sweaters? Patagonia blended wool and cashmere for the Wool Cask crewneck ($149), for increased warmth and comfort.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Two technologies combine to make Mountain Hardwear’s Hydra Pro gloves ($125) the most waterproof we’ve tested. And with heavy fleece insulation, they’re great for skiers and winter alpinists.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    It’s slightly insane to spend this much on boardshorts, but Bluesmiths’ ($175) really are the nicest we’ve ever worn. Cut from quick-drying Schoeller fabric, they look and feel twice as good as your average boardshorts—and will last twice as long.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Braven’s armored 625s portable speaker ($180) plays up to 16 hours of music on a charge. It also comes with a drybag, so it’ll go every- where you go, rafting trips included.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    It’s about time. The Lazer Effect helmet ($120) features an integrated GoPro mount, the first to do so. Score extra points with the budding Warren Miller on your list by giving the helmet and GoPro’s HD Hero2 camera ($300) as a pair.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    K2’s Backside Pilchuck kit ($200) is a great gift for backcountry newbies. The 11-liter pack, just big enough for skins storage and a few extra layers, comes with a shovel and probe. Complete the kit with one more mandatory item: a beacon, like Backcountry Access’ Tracker DTS ($240).

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    MSR’s four-person Flex 4 cook system ($160) is exactly what you want when camping: four stainless-steel mugs, four plates, two pots, one handle, and two lids. And it all fits together like a set of Russian nesting dolls.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Backyard swings put a smile on everyone’s face. And Dzierlenga F+U’s tree swing ($180) is the most beautiful we’ve seen. The wood is cedar, the rope is Manila, and your kids or grandparents will love the combination.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Sony’s rugged, water-proof Action Cam ($270) is the company’s first foray into wearable video cameras. While its size and specs make it comparable to a stock GoPro, two key features set it apart: on-board Wi-Fi and digital stabilization.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Revo’s polarized Windspeed sun- glasses ($209) are tricked out with adjustable nose and ear rubber and crystal-clear, scratch-resistant lenses. Plus, aviators look good on just about every head shape.

  • Photo: Inga Hendrickson

    Therm-a-Rest’s LuxuryLite Ultra-Lite cot ($230) is the size of a roll of tent poles and weighs under three pounds—small and light enough to take into the backcountry.

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