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  • Photo: Douglas Tompkins

    Energy

    The Chernobyl nuclear power station looms over the mouldering remains of the former town of Pripyat, Ukraine.

    These images are from Energy: Overdevelopment and the Delusion of Endless Growth, a new coffee table book by the Post Carbon Institute and the Foundation for Deep Ecology that shows and tells us, in graphic detail, the backstories that make up our current energy economy.

  • Photo: Douglas Tompkins

    Energy

    The Ralco dam on the Biobío River is one of the highest dams in the world. It and a second downstream dam delivered a deathblow to the upper Biobío, Chile’s richest watershed, inhabited by the indigenous Pehuenche people.

    Mary Catherine O'Connor spoke with Energy's co-editor, Tom Butler, about the value of beauty, the potential of energy ruin porn, the population problem, and the importance of energy literacy.

  • Photo: EcoFlight

    Energy

    Natural gas development has severely fragmented habitat in many parts of the country, including here, in Wyoming.

    In an excerpt of Energy, Post Carbon Institute fellow Richard Heinberg argues that the cleanest energy is that which we don't generate in the first place. "In short," he writes, "our task in the 21st century is to scale back the human enterprise until it can be supported with levels of power that can be sustainably supplied, and until it no longer overwhelms natural ecosystems."

  • Photo: George Wuerthner

    Energy

    Denuded slopes due to mountaintop-removal coal mining in Appalachia.

    The third part of our Energy Literacy series is a short quiz with five terms that are used frequently in Energy, including energy curtailment and energy slaves. Can you define them? Test your own personal energy literacy.

  • Photo: George Wuerthner

    Energy

    A gas refinery looms behind a cemetery in Bloomfield, New Mexico.

  • Photo: George Wuerthner

    Energy

    To meet growing demand, energy companies have been investing in production of unconventional fossil fuels, such as the tar sands development in Alberta, Canada, shown here.

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