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  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    An iceberg leaves the fjord that leads to Black Angel mine.

    An iceberg leaves the fjord that leads to Black Angel mine.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    Mininnguaq Kleist of Greenland's Office of Self Governance flies in the daily helicopter shuttle to Uummannaq.

    Mininnguaq Kleist of Greenland's Office of Self Governance flies in the daily helicopter shuttle to Uummannaq.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    Two scientists from GEUS, Denmark's geological survey, carry glacier-monitoring equipment to an Air Greenland helicopter.

    Two scientists from GEUS, Denmark's geological survey, carry glacier-monitoring equipment to an Air Greenland helicopter.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    Calving glaciers spill off the icecap north of Upernavik.

    Calving glaciers spill off the icecap north of Upernavik.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    The dock at Black Angel mine; the main shaft and zinc deposits are 2,000 feet up the white cliff in the back of the frame.

    The dock at Black Angel mine; the main shaft and zinc deposits are 2,000 feet up the white cliff in the back of the frame.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    Mine operator Tim Daffern at the British-run Black Angel Zine mine near Uummannaq.

    Mine operator Tim Daffern at the British-run Black Angel Zine mine near Uummannaq.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    Rule #1 in Greenland: Don't pet the cute sled dogs, or they'll rip you to shreds. This one seemed safe.

    Rule #1 in Greenland: Don't pet the cute sled dogs, or they'll rip you to shreds. This one seemed safe.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    A church in the whaling village of Kangersuatsiaq, a natural strait where the Danes netted belugas in the 19th century.

    A church in the whaling village of Kangersuatsiaq, a natural strait where the Danes netted belugas in the 19th century.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    The cemetery in Upernavik, on Greenland's central-west coast: Thanks to Danish missionaries, most Greenlanders are Christian, and many have Biblical names.

    The cemetery in Upernavik, on Greenland's central-west coast: Thanks to Danish missionaries, most Greenlanders are Christian, and many have Biblical names.

  • Photo: McKenzie Funk

    The citizens of Niaqornat wave the Greenlandic flag to celebrate the island's steps toward independence.

    The citizens of Niaqornat wave the Greenlandic flag to celebrate the island's steps toward independence.

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