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  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    Looking at the house from the south; on the left end is the master bath, whose siding is rusted steel; on the far right is the guest wing.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    The west end of the house, with the detached studio on the hill above. The steel-and-redwood trellis jutting above the master bath is a design element that mimics the surrounding ridges, the studio roof, and the undulating principle seen in the floor plan.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    The first view inside the front entry, with a view toward the Wineglass Mountains, to the south, and a step-down to the right into the greenhouse.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    Looking into the kitchen-and-greenhouse area. The cabinets are crafted from vertical-grain fir. The lights were custom-made by Garcia Art Glass, of San Antonio, Texas.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    The west wall of the greenhouse is covered in thin-set mortar hand-troweled to resemble plaster. On the floor, which is made of sustainable massaranduba, are the house ducks, Boudreaux and Thibideau, and Grace the German shepherd, standing at the entrance to the master bedroom.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    Looking out from the kitchen to the citrus trees in the greenhouse. The windows were reclaimed from a renovation of the Livingston post office.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    The view from the greenhouse into the kitchen; most of the year, the natural light here and in other areas precludes the need for any artificial lighting during the day.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    Looking from the master bedroom into the greenhouse. The contrast of steel frame, Douglas fir woodwork, Lexan windows, and thin-set walls was consciously chosen for both aesthetics and load bearing.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    The view from the dining room into the living room. The walls are made of Douglas fir, harvested and milled locally at Ridgeway Milling, in Livingston; the fireplace uses waxed plaster at the base, with cold-rolled steel sheets above.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    Lori Ryker is sitting in the expansive living room; down the hallway are the kitchen and greenhouse. The designers intended for the open-space plan to undulate from wide to narrow through the length of the house. The floors seen here are concrete, with radiant heat.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    Looking past the greenhouse at the exterior of the living room, with stucco below and Douglas fir above.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    Outside Nave's woodwork/steelwork shop is the two-kilowatt solar array, which supplies 30 percent of the power for the compound—including the studio, which houses eight computers and 16 monitors. The shop is built of galvanized corrugated metal.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    The butterfly roof above the greenhouse drains runoff water into the duck pond, below. Behind that is the deck off the master bedroom. The main roof is designed to blend with the gentle slopes in the landscape.

  • Photo: Photo by Gregg Segal

    The Ryker/Nave House

    From left, design assistant Jamie Slagel, Brett Nave, and Pumpkin the cat drawing up plans in the studio.

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