Mountain Bike Photography’s Toughest Challenge

Mountain Bike Photography’s Toughest Challenge

The Deep Summer Photo Challenge at Crankworx Whistler, which is the largest mountain biking festival in the world, is one of the most respected and grueling tests for photographers. Five industry-leading shooters are invited to the event, along with one wildcard contestant, to prove their photographic and mental strength for 72 hours of intense work and sleepless nights. Ultimately they edit together a three-to-five-minute slideshow viewed and judged at Whistler’s Olympic Plaza. Squamish-based photographer Ben Haggar was one of the top five selected for the 2016 contest. We caught up with him to learn more about the nonstop days and what he captured.

Portraits of the Appalachian Trail

Portraits of the Appalachian Trail

This spring, Virginia-based photographers Chet Strange and Parker Michels-Boyce set up a photo booth at Mile 806 of the Appalachian Trail. Using a classic studio backdrop, they captured dozens of northbound thru-hikers as they made their way toward Cold Mountain in the George Washington and Jefferson National Forests. Strange and Michels-Boyce aimed to capture the variety of folks and personalities tackling one of America’s great trails. Here are 13 of our favorites.

The 68-Year-Old Canyoneer Legend Descending Death Valley

The 68-Year-Old Canyoneer Legend Descending Death Valley

Scott Swaney, a former oilman and current badass a couple years shy of 70, has more first descents in Death Valley National Park than anyone on earth. He spent the past decade looking for everything from tight canyons to massive drop-offs and is believed to have led or been involved with 203 of the 258 first descents in the park. Swaney has burned through partners who couldn’t stand the heat and hard labor of exploring his hellish playground, but he continues to recruit new ones, eager to keep exploring. This spring, photographer Ian Tuttle, who had never canyoneered, stuffed his camera—a film Mamiya 645 AFDii—into a backpack and followed along.

Why Slackline in a Gym When You Could Slackline Over a Waterfall in Hawaii?

Why Slackline in a Gym When You Could Slackline Over a Waterfall in Hawaii?

At just 19 years old, Alex Mason is one of the youngest phenoms in slacklining. He’s traversed the globe to compete, winning the Teva World Cup and the Slackline World Championships, all before he graduated high school. For his biggest project yet, he teamed up with his mentor, “Sketchy” Andy Lewis, and a Redbull film crew to trickline his way through the world’s first “slackladder” — a term coined by Redbull.

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