Adventure

McKinley Raising Price on Climing Permits

Park will put money to search and rescue

Climbing Mount McKinley will get more expensive next year, as the National Park Service increases expedition permits in an effort to better fund search and rescue missions on the mountain. The NPS will charge $50 more per permit for climbers under age 24, pushing the total cost to $250, and will charge older climbers $350. Permits were first introduced for $150 in 1995, then jumped to $200 in 2005. The service is looking to offset search-and-rescue costs, including safety education for climbers, a program that some estimates indicate have cut deaths on the mountain in half. Stagnant permit income has created in a 13 percent budget gap under current prices. Park officials introduced the age-graded pricing structure to keep McKinley accessible for young climbers. At 20,320 feet, McKinley is the highest peak in North America.

Read more at Adventure Journal

 

 

Our mission to inspire readers to get outside has never been more critical. In recent years, Outside Online has reported on groundbreaking research linking time in nature to improved mental and physical health, and we’ve kept you informed about the unprecedented threats to America’s public lands. Our rigorous coverage helps spark important debates about wellness and travel and adventure, and it provides readers an accessible gateway to new outdoor passions. Time outside is essential—and we can help you make the most of it. Making a financial contribution to Outside Online only takes a few minutes and will ensure we can continue supplying the trailblazing, informative journalism that readers like you depend on. We hope you’ll support us. Thank you.
Contribute to Outside
Filed To: News
More Adventure