Adventure

Scientists '5 Years' From Cloned Mammoth

Joint project seeks to bring animal back

The scientific team behind a project to clone woolly mammoths from frozen remains says it may be less than five years from bringing the animal back to life. Researchers from Japan's Kinki University and a mammoth museum in Russia plan to use marrow from a thigh bone to create a viable mammoth embryo. Scientists recovered the bone in Siberia this August and hope to implant it in a female elephant surrogate. Scientists have pursued cloning mammoths from cells since the 1990s, but have had difficulty finding nuclei with undamaged genes, a requirement for cloning. The team believes that the thigh, which is among the best preserved mammoth bones ever found, has a high chance of containing the necessary DNA. Mammoths have been extinct for approximately 10,000 years.

Read more at the Daily Mail

Our mission to inspire readers to get outside has never been more critical. In recent years, Outside Online has reported on groundbreaking research linking time in nature to improved mental and physical health, and we’ve kept you informed about the unprecedented threats to America’s public lands. Our rigorous coverage helps spark important debates about wellness and travel and adventure, and it provides readers an accessible gateway to new outdoor passions. Time outside is essential—and we can help you make the most of it. Making a financial contribution to Outside Online only takes a few minutes and will ensure we can continue supplying the trailblazing, informative journalism that readers like you depend on. We hope you’ll support us. Thank you.
Contribute to Outside
Filed To: News
More Adventure