Adventure

Blood Cells Found on Otzi the Iceman

Cells are 5,300 years old

A team of scientists from Germany and Italy have identified red blood cells from the 5,300-year-old body of Oetzi the Iceman, the oldest human blood cells ever observed. Researchers found the red blood cells around an arrow wound that is believed to have killed Otzi, likely disproving a theory that he died several days after receiving the injury. The technique used to examine the Iceman's blood might also be used to study Egyptian mummies. European scientists sequenced the Otzi's genome in February.

Read more at BBC

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