Adventure

Greenland Glacial Melt Slows in Areas

Sea-level rise could be less dramatic

A new study by researchers from the University of Washington's Polar Science Center suggests that Greenland's glaciers are melting significantly slower than previously believed. Ian Joughin and colleagues analyzed radar images of 200 Greenland glaciers that revealed dramatic inconsistencies in ice flow. Melt on the Jakobshavn glacier abruptly doubled its rate a few years ago, suggesting a possible six-foot rise in ocean levels by the end of the century. "Some people feared if they could double their speed over two or three years, they could keep doubling," Joughin said. He now estimates a sea level rise of three feet or less. Greenland's glaciers hold enough water to raise the sea level by 20 feet.

Read more at NPR

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