Adventure

Concern Over Low-Quality Malaria Drugs

Drug-resistant strains more common

Sub-standard and fake malaria drugs are threatening to undo gains made in the fight against the disease, according to a new study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases on Monday. Scientists from the National Institutes of Health found that 36 percent of anti-malarial drugs analyzed in Southeast Asia were fake, while a third of drugs in sub-Saharan Africa contained either too much or not enough of the active ingredient. The researchers warn that the counterfeit drugs are contributing to a rise in drug-resistant malaria strains. More than three billion people worldwide are at risk from the mosquito-borne disease, which kills around 650,000 people a year.

Read more at the New York Times

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