Adventure

Court Backs EPA Global Warming Rules

Landmark appeal upholds CO2 regulation

A federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., ruled Tuesday that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was "unambiguously correct" in creating the first-ever regulations aimed at reducing greenhouse gases. The 2009 rules, challenged by business interests, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and several states, set limits on industrial and automotive emissions under the Clean Air Act. Opponents of the regulation argued that greenhouse gases did not endanger human health or welfare and that limiting emissions would hurt businesses. In the court's ruling, the three-judge panel said the EPA had sufficient evidence to conclude that human emissions were, in fact, contributing to climate change. "Today's ruling by the court confirms that the EPA's common sense solutions to address climate pollution are firmly anchored in science and law," said Fred Krupp, president of the Environmental Defense Fund.

Read more at Bloomberg Businessweek

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