Adventure

Bonobo Produces Stone Tools

Remarkably like those used by humans

A captive bonobo at the University of Haifa has learned to make stone tools that are on par with those made by early humans, scientists say. Researcher Eviatar Nevo hid food inside a log, which he then gave to Kanzi, a 30-year-old male bonobo, to open up. Kanzi responded by creating stone knives and drills to break through the wood. The chimp had been taught to create primitive tools through flintknapping in the 1990s, and the skill seems to have paid off: while Kanzi was able to open up 24 of the logs, a companion, who was unable to use tools, only succeeded at opening two.

Via New Scientist

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