Adventure

U.S. Authorizes First Jaguar Habitat

The cats used to inhabit Colorado and North Carolina

On Monday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service published the first plan to provide a protected habitat for jaguars. The 838,232-acre area, which stretches through four mountain ranges in southeastern Arizona and New Mexico's San Luis Mountains, would be protected from any activity that would "adversely modify" the land. In a 2007 resolution from the American Society of Mammalogists, jaguar advocates called the creation of a protected habitat "vital to the long-term resilience and survival of the species, especially in response to ongoing climate change." The cats have been listed as endangered since 1997, but this is the first attempt to create a recovery plan for the species.

Via Scientific American

Our mission to inspire readers to get outside has never been more critical. In recent years, Outside Online has reported on groundbreaking research linking time in nature to improved mental and physical health, and we’ve kept you informed about the unprecedented threats to America’s public lands. Our rigorous coverage helps spark important debates about wellness and travel and adventure, and it provides readers an accessible gateway to new outdoor passions. Time outside is essential—and we can help you make the most of it. Making a financial contribution to Outside Online only takes a few minutes and will ensure we can continue supplying the trailblazing, informative journalism that readers like you depend on. We hope you’ll support us. Thank you.
Contribute to Outside
Filed To: News
More Adventure