Adventure

Tate Exhibit Criticized for Butterfly Deaths

9,000 killed in Damien Hirst's "Out of Love"

What is a windowless room filled with thousands of butterflies, some fruit, and a few humans? Possibly art and definitely a butterfly death trap. Over the 23 weeks it spent at London’s Tate Modern, Damien Hirst’s exhibit “In and Out of Love” killed about 9,000 butterflies, according to reports. The exhibit was comprised of butterflies flying around and eating fruit in two bare galleries, which museum goers were invited to walk through. Hirst introduced about 400 new butterflies into the rooms each week to replace those that had died from contact with humans and other causes. “Damien Hirst’s quest to be edgy is as boring as it is callous,” said a spokesman for PETA. “It does not matter whether Hirst killed the animals himself or sat by while thousands of them were massacred for his own unjustifiable amusement.” A Tate spokesperson defended the exhibit, saying, “The butterflies used in this work were all sourced from reputable U.K. butterfly houses and were selected from varieties known to thrive in the conditions created.” 

Via The Telegraph

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