Adventure

Scientists Find Hominid Ate Grass

Paleo diet redux

Turns out your aunt who went to Woodstock that one time probably isn’t the world’s first vegetarian. Scientists at the University of Oxford have discovered a hominid species that, some three and a half million years ago, maintained a diet of mostly grass and sedge. Chemical analysis of its teeth discovered that the Central African Australopithecus bahrelghazali, unlike most other hominids, who ate fruit and leaves, may have even evolved to an exclusively grass-and-sedge-based diet. Before this discovery, the two-million-year-old Paranthropus boisei (pictured) was thought to be the oldest grass-eating hominid. 

Via Science News

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