Adventure

Apes May Experience Mid-Life Crisis Too

Survey of 500 chimps and orangutans

An international team of scientists from the U.S., Japan, Germany, and the U.K. is believed to have discovered the equivalent of a “mid-life crisis” in apes. The researchers surveyed over 500 chimpanzees and orangutans, rating their mood, sociability, and success at achieving various goals. Analysis of the survey revealed that general well-being in apes dipped in middle age and climbed again in their later years. Great apes in captivity often live to be 50 or older. “In all three groups we find evidence that well-being is lowest in chimpanzees and orangutans at an age that roughly corresponds to mid-life in humans," said Alex Weiss, a psychologist at Edinburgh University.

Via The Guardian

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