Gear Nostalgia: 10 Products to Take You Back

Silver bullet Airstream trailer have been a part of the American road trip dream since 1939 when Wally Byam who had been building trailer for his friends, upgraded and moved production out of his backyard. The design has endured ever since, although the plumbing is much nicer, and now you can get them outfitted with LED lights and flat screen TVs. The classic, single-axle Flying Cloud comes in lengths from 19 feet to 30. (Price varies) (Courtesy of Airstream)

Airstream: Flying Cloud

Silver bullet Airstream trailer have been a part of the American road trip dream since 1939 when Wally Byam who had been building trailer for his friends, upgraded and moved production out of his backyard. The design has endured ever since, although the plumbing is much nicer, and now you can get them outfitted with LED lights and flat screen TVs. The classic, single-axle Flying Cloud comes in lengths from 19 feet to 30. (Price varies)

Kletterwerks: Flip

Growing up, Dana Gleason the 3rd was fascinated by the backpack prototypes his dad had hanging around the house. And his father, Dana Gleason of Dana Designs and Mystery Ranch fame, was really good at making packs. When D3 launched Kletterwerks in 2012, he revisited his father’s initial designs, like the Flip, which is based off a model from 1975. The 22-liter pack is still simple: It’s made of Cordura with minimal pockets and a top-loading design, but it has updates like a laptop sleeve and Tabler buckles. The Gleasons still make all of their packs in Montana, and D3 says his dad is his most eagle-eyed critic. $197

(Tim Gates)


Pendleton: Government Camp Shirt

Pendleton has been making plaid wool shirts since the 1920. The basic idea hasn’t varied much in the past 90 years—wool is warm—and the shirts became ubiquitous across cold parts of the country. You can still buy essentially the same shirt, but in 2011 Pendleton launched the Portland Collection, a capsule collection that was more PNW hipster than tucked-in Minnesota dad. The Government Camp shirt, named after the ski town at the base of Mt. Hood, takes the classic idea and slims it down just enough to be cool. $198

(Courtesy of Pendleton)


Buck Knives: Folding Hunter

Buck Knives, which Hoyt Buck founded in 1947, is credited with the invention of the folding knife. Thanks to Buck we don’t have to go around with sharps hanging off our belts unless we choose to do so. The Folding Hunter knife has been in their line, relatively unchanged, since 1962. It’s simple, lockback design is the baseline for many of their other knives, but the original still works just as well. $69

(Courtesy of Buck Knife)


Airstream: Flying Cloud

Silver bullet Airstream trailer have been a part of the American road trip dream since 1939 when Wally Byam who had been building trailer for his friends, upgraded and moved production out of his backyard. The design has endured ever since, although the plumbing is much nicer, and now you can get them outfitted with LED lights and flat screen TVs. The classic, single-axle Flying Cloud comes in lengths from 19 feet to 30. (Price varies)

Topo Designs: Travel Bag

Made in Colorado, by Coloradans, Topo Designs is a new company with a vintage aesthetic. Their packs, like the 30-liter Travel Bag is styled (and colored) like an old-school climbing pack—it wouldn’t be out of place in a Wes Anderson movie—but it carries a big load comfortably. It also integrates with their smaller Trip Pack, so you can hook your bags together and carry them as one piece. And, it’s carry-on sized. $89

(Ali Vagnini)


Danner Boots: Stumptown Mountain Light

Danner Boots are cut and stitched by hand in Portland, Oregon, where the company has been making shoes since1932. Danner sticks by their handiwork; it’s possible to re-sole and re-build them, so one pair will last forever. And they’ll do that repair work for you. That’s why the timeless-looking, Gore-Tex-lined Mountain Light is a good buy, even though it’s spendier than some other full-leather boots. The price, paid out over the rest of your life, comes out to pennies per wear. $330

(Jordan Hufnagle)


Shinola: Runwell

Detroit-based Shinola, long known for making watches (and shoe polish) jumped into the bicycle game in 2012 with the 11-speed Runwell, an American-made city bike with an internal hub, Shimano components, and commuter-friendly geometry. Shinola snatched up bike design legend Sky Yaeger, who worked at Bianchi for years, as part of their team. Her experience and attention to detail shows in the understated but classy construction. $2,950

(Courtesy of Shinola)


Poler Stuff: The Napsack

Portland-based Poler is trying to prove that you don’t have to be a fast and light mountaineer to enjoy camping, and that car camping, or post-surf bonfires are equally valid ways to get outside. Their Napsack, a wearable sleeping bag that makes you look slightly gnome-like, encompasses that. Modeled after a ‘70s puffy jacket, it’s functional, but not super serious. The Napsack got some play on HBO’s Girls last season and is showing up at campgrounds across the Northwest. $130

(Courtesy of Poler)


Field Notes: Expedition Edition

Remember notebooks? Those hand-held devices you wrote your thoughts in before you had Twitter? Turns out they’re still around, and, when you’re somewhere you don’t get 3G (like the wilderness), still pretty convenient. Field Notes’ expedition edition notebooks are made of water- and tear-resistant paper, so even if they get drenched and abused in the bottom of your pack you’ll still be able to read your profound musings. $10

(Courtesy of Field Notes)


Cascade Designs: Thermarest Neo Air XLite

In 1972, two recently laid-off Boeing engineers, Jim Lea and Neil Anderson, made the first Therm-a-Rest by sealing open-cell foam in a sandwich maker. Their idea, a self-inflating mattress that packs up small, still stands, but Therm-a-Rest’s newest generation of mattresses, the Neo Air, doesn’t have any additional foam, it just uses air pockets to keep you insulated and off the ground, so it’s significantly lighter and smaller than the pads of the past. $160

(Courtesy of Therm-a-Rest)

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