Walking Jaguars in Bolivia

Volunteers walk one of three Puma sisters known as Inti, Wara and Yassi through the Bolivian jungle. The Pumas were rescued from a market where they were for sale as a trio of young cubs. (Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)
Volunteers walk one of three Puma sisters known as Inti, Wara and Yassi through the Bolivian jungle. The Pumas were rescued from a market where they were for sale as a trio of young cubs.

Volunteers walk one of three Puma sisters known as Inti, Wara and Yassi through the Bolivian jungle. The Pumas were rescued from a market where they were for sale as a trio of young cubs.

Noemi, a Bolivian Quechua woman who runs Ambue Ari, hugs one of three puma sisters that she raised. She has built a special relationship with the sisters. At times she even lets them run free in the jungle and calls them back.

Noemi, a Bolivian Quechua woman who runs Ambue Ari, hugs one of three puma sisters that she raised. She has built a special relationship with the sisters. At times she even lets them run free in the jungle and calls them back.
(Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)


Tania "Nena" Baltazar picks bugs off the spider monkey Morocha at the Ambue Ari Reserve. Nena and Juan Carlos Antezana run the controversial organization Inti Wara Yasi that rescues mistreated animals.

Tania
(Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)


Morocha the Spider Monkey plays on the door to the mess hall at the Ambue Ari jungle reserve. Although the monkeys may appear harmless, many volunteers have scars from monkey bites, and they are known to steal cameras and other gadgets.

Morocha the Spider Monkey plays on the door to the mess hall at the Ambue Ari jungle reserve. Although the monkeys may appear harmless, many volunteers have scars from monkey bites, and they are known to steal cameras and other gadgets.
(Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)


A spider monkey named Morocha drinks from the spigot at the Ambue Ari Reserve. Morocha roams free around the camp and reserve.

A spider monkey named Morocha drinks from the spigot at the Ambue Ari Reserve. Morocha roams free around the camp and reserve.
(Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)


Author Thayer Walker with the friendly spider monkey Morocha at Ambue Ari jungle reserve in the Santa Cruz region of Bolivia.

Author Thayer Walker with the friendly spider monkey Morocha at Ambue Ari jungle reserve in the Santa Cruz region of Bolivia.
(Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)


Faustino, a howler monkey that was rescued from a life as a pet where he regularly drank alcohol and watched TV all day, snacks on frui. Inti Wara Yassi tries to socialize groups of rescued howler monkeys to release them back into the jungle, but Faustino's troubled past makes it unlikely that he can be released.

Faustino, a howler monkey that was rescued from a life as a pet where he regularly drank alcohol and watched TV all day, snacks on frui. Inti Wara Yassi tries to socialize groups of rescued howler monkeys to release them back into the jungle, but Faustino
(Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)


British volunteer Caroline Almond walks Katie the Jaguar through the Bolivian jungle at the Ambue Ari Reserve. The cats are walked on a leash, but they are far stronger than one person, so there are normally at least two people on the leash should the cat decide to take off after a passing animal, or human.

British volunteer Caroline Almond walks Katie the Jaguar through the Bolivian jungle at the Ambue Ari Reserve. The cats are walked on a leash, but they are far stronger than one person, so there are normally at least two people on the leash should the cat
(Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)


Volunteers develop extremely close bonds with the cats, and many stay for various months, spending each day with the same cat. The cats are quite aware of the presence of any new caretakers in their vicinity.

Volunteers develop extremely close bonds with the cats, and many stay for various months, spending each day with the same cat. The cats are quite aware of the presence of any new caretakers in their vicinity.
(Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)


Amira the Jaguar gets her daily walk through a waist-deep swamp in the Ambue Ari reserve in the Santa Cruz region of Bolivia. Most jaguars rescued by Inti Wara Yassi get renamed, but the group decided Amira had a nice enough name to keep.

Amira the Jaguar gets her daily walk through a waist-deep swamp in the Ambue Ari reserve in the Santa Cruz region of Bolivia. Most jaguars rescued by Inti Wara Yassi get renamed, but the group decided Amira had a nice enough name to keep.
(Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)


During the wet season everyone covers their entire body—usually with two layers—to protect themselves from the incredible swarms of mosquitos that may carry Dengue Fever or Malaria.

During the wet season everyone covers their entire body—usually with two layers—to protect themselves from the incredible swarms of mosquitos that may carry Dengue Fever or Malaria.
(Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)


Amira roughhouses with British volunteers during her daily walk. The jaguars are accustomed to "jumping" the volunteers when they first meet, often pawing and licking their entire body. Inti Wara Yassi's directors claim that there have been no major injuries, but volunteers have scars and many have received stitches.

Amira roughhouses with British volunteers during her daily walk. The jaguars are accustomed to
(Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)


Amira the Jaguar plays hide and seek behind a tree trunk during her daily walk with a British volunteer in the Ambue Ari reserve. Amira was rescued just a few months ago from a Middle Eastern family in Bolivia's Beni region.

Amira the Jaguar plays hide and seek behind a tree trunk during her daily walk with a British volunteer in the Ambue Ari reserve. Amira was rescued just a few months ago from a Middle Eastern family in Bolivia's Beni region.
(Noah Friedman-Rudovsky)

Filed To: Bolivia
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