HealthNutrition

Athlete Recipes: Cross Country Skier Andy Newell's Flapjacks

The difference between hitting the summit and hitting the wall often comes down to the fuel in your belly. Here, 11 pros share their favorite nutritional secrets and performance-enhancing recipes.

Grandma's flapjacks. (Photo: Wikipedia)

THE MEAL: Newell’s pancake recipe, passed down to him from his grandfather, has helped fuel him through two Olympics—not to mention two- to three-hour training sessions in freezing temperatures. “This meal definitely gives me the energy needed to go out and do skiing hill repeats or intervals,” says Newell, who drenches his cakes in the maple syrup from his native Vermont. “Sometimes though, especially when eating this meal after a workout, I’ll incorporate more protein by cooking up a few more eggs or throwing in some Greek yogurt. Then you've got a full on party for your taste buds.”

WHY IT WORKS: Korzun likes this as a post-workout meal for Newell because it delivers a “quick pick-me-up from the maple syrup and a sustainable complex carbohydrate that will burn slowly from the buckwheat.” Newell also sprinkles his pancakes with blueberries and bananas, both of which, Korzun points out, contain potassium, a key electrolyte that’s sweat out during training. Along with the eggs and milk in the batter (along with the yogurt Newell sometimes adds), the skier gets all the protein he needs to make this a perfect recovery meal.

SECRET INGREDIENT: Maple syrup contains manganese, a mineral that helps the body properly metabolize carbohydrates.

1. Mix one cup of all-purpose flour, one cup of buckwheat flour, three teaspoona of baking powder, 1/2 teaspoon of salt, two eggs, two cups of milk, and two teaspoons of canola oil in a bowl.
2. Heat a pan on medium-high heat.
3. Melt a slab of butter on the pan and pour about half a cup of batter into the pan.
4. When the edges of the pancake round, flip it and cook until firm.
5. Serve with sliced banana, berries, and maple syrup on top.

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From Outside Magazine, Nov 2012
Filed To: Nutrition
Lead Photo: Wikipedia
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